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To get acquainted with Mathematica's solving functions, I tried to work out a solution to a MinuteMath problem:

There is a list of seven numbers. The average of the first four numbers is 5, and the average of the last four numbers is 8. If the average of all seven numbers is 46/7, then what is the number common to both sets of four numbers?

Of course, this is an excercise that can be solved without computer, but how can I solve this using Mathematica? My first approach

X = Table[Subscript[x, i], {i, 1, 7}];
cond = {
  Mean[Part[X, 1 ;; 4]] == 5,  
  Mean[Part[X, 4 ;; 7]] == 8, 
  Mean[X] == 46/7
};
Solve[cond, Subscript[x, 4]]

returned no solution. My second approach

X = Table[Subscript[x, i], {i, 1, 7}];
rules = {Mean[Part[X, 1 ;; 4]] -> 5,  
   Mean[Part[X, 4 ;; 7]] -> 8, 
   Mean[X] -> 46/7
};
Solve[
  Mean[X] == Mean[Part[X, 1 ;; 4]] 
    + Mean[Part[X, 4 ;; 7]] 
    - Subscript[x, 4] /. rules, 
  Subscript[x, 4]
]

gives a wrong solution (45/7 instead 6). What did I wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Ok, there is a problem with the second approach. It should read 7*Mean[X] == 4*Mean[Part[X, 1 ;; 4]] + 4*Mean[Part[X, 4 ;; 7]] - Subscript[x, 4], but this reduces to True when applying rules... Why is that? –  Karsten W. Apr 6 '11 at 12:48
    
Your second approach has 3 serious problems. 1st the LHS of your rules are quite complicated and in less contrived cases (or if you simplify/expand your equations before applying the rules) they will fail to match anything. 2nd your equations aren't actually true. Explicitly expand and look at each side and you'll see what's happened. 3rd When adding equations together you lose information. You lose what the equation differences are. So reducing the problem to a single equation like you have done will never yield the full result. –  Simon Apr 8 '11 at 22:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The first piece of code that you give is fine. The only problem is there is no solution for x_4 alone. If you replace the last line by Solve[cond] then Mathmatica automagically chooses the free variables and you'll get the solution.


I think that a simple/trivial example would make this type problem clear:

In[1]:= Solve[x==1&&y==2,x]
        Solve[x==1&&y==2,{x,y}]
Out[1]= {}
Out[2]= {{x->1,y->2}}

The final output can also be obtained using Solve[x==1&&y==2], where Mma guesses the free variables. This behaviour differs from that of Mathematica 7. In Mathematica 8 a new option for Solve (and related functions) called MaxExtraCondtions was introduced. This allows Solve to give solutions that use the new ConditionalExpression and is intended to make the behaviour of solve more consistent and predictable. Here's how it works in this simple example:

In[3]:= Solve[x==1&&y==2, x, MaxExtraConditions->1]
Out[3]= {{x -> ConditionalExpression[1, y==2]}}

See the above linked to docs for more examples that show why this Option is useful. (Although maybe defaulting to Automatic instead of 0 would be a more pragmatic design choice for the new option...)


Finally, here's your first solution rewritten a little:

In[1]:= X=Array[Symbol["x"<>ToString[#]]&,{7}]
Out[1]= {x1,x2,x3,x4,x5,x6,x7}

In[2]:= cond=Mean[X[[1;;4]]]==5&&Mean[X[[4;;7]]]==8&&Mean[X]==46/7;

In[3]:= Solve[cond]
         x4/.%
Out[3]= {{x1->14-x2-x3,x4->6,x5->26-x6-x7}}
Out[4]= {6}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for fixing my code! –  Karsten W. Apr 6 '11 at 12:31
    
@Karsten: No probs! –  Simon Apr 6 '11 at 22:35
    
Simon, in Mma 7 Solve[x == 1 && y == 2, x] yields {{x -> 1}} ; has this changed in v8? –  Mr.Wizard Apr 7 '11 at 0:32
    
@Mr.Wizard: Yeah - it looks like it has. I thought it was a little strange that Solve[x == 1 && y == 2, x] didn't work in Mma8. The behaviour seems a little counter intuitive. Maybe it's unintentional and we should point it out to WRI. –  Simon Apr 7 '11 at 0:48
    
@Karsten: @Mr.Wizard: Got a reply from WRI. This was an intentional change in Mma8 that is meant to lead to more predictable behaviour for more complicated examples. There is a new Option for Solve called MaxExtraConditions that controls this behaviour and is defaulted to 0. See the edit. –  Simon Apr 8 '11 at 22:22

Perhaps more compact:

Reduce[Mean@Array[f, 4] == 5 && 
       Mean@Array[f, 4, 4] == 8 && 
       Mean@Array[f, 7] == 46/7]
(*
-> f[5] == 26 - f[6] - f[7] && 
   f[4] == 6 && 
   f[1] == 14 - f[2] - f[3]
*)  

Although for clarity, I probably prefer:

Reduce[Sum[f@i, {i, 4}] == 20 && 
       Sum[f@i, {i, 4, 7}] == 32 && 
       Sum[f@i, {i, 7}] == 46]

Edit

Note that I am using function upvalues as vars and not list elements. I prefer this way because:

  • You don't need to initialize the list (Table[Subscript ... in your example`)
  • The resulting expressions are usually less cluttered (No Part[ ;; ], etc)
share|improve this answer
    
You guys are quick! How often do you check for new questions? –  Mr.Wizard Apr 6 '11 at 12:01
1  
@Mr. Not many times per second –  belisarius Apr 6 '11 at 12:02
    
o_O lol I could almost believe that ;-) –  Mr.Wizard Apr 6 '11 at 12:03
    
@Mr.W: Your comment is only a couple of minutes behind! –  Simon Apr 6 '11 at 12:05
    
@Simon I was thinking "oh, a new question, let's see if I can answer it first" but no, two people before me. Don't you guys do anything else? –  Mr.Wizard Apr 6 '11 at 12:07

for 7 vars ,you need 7 equations , or there will be infinite solutions . here please choose Reduce.

x = a /@ Range[7]; Reduce[{Mean[x[[1 ;; 4]]] == 5, Mean[x[[4 ;; 7]]] == 8, Mean[x] == 46/7}, x]
share|improve this answer

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