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Is it possible to get the parent process-id using Node.JS? I would like to detect if the parent is killed or fails in such a way that it cannot notify the child. If this happens, the parent process id of the child should become 1.

This would be preferable to requiring the parent to periodically send a keep-alive signal and also preferable to running the ps command.

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Do you use system "Child Processes?" –  Emmerman Apr 6 '11 at 12:06
    
@Emmerman: I'm not sure what you mean. The parent runs require('child_process').spawn(process.argv[0], ['path_to_child.js']) in order to start the child. Then if it needs to talk to the child, it uses the stdin and stdout of the child. stderr is piped to a log. I am guessing the answer would be yes? –  George Bailey Apr 6 '11 at 12:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use pid-file. Something like that

var util = require('util'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    pidfile = '/var/run/nodemaster.pid';

try {
    var pid = fs.readFileSync(pidfile);
    //REPLACE with your signal or use another method to check process existence :)
    process.kill(pid, 'SIGUSR2'); 
    util.puts('Master already running');
    process.exit(1);
} catch (e) {
    fs.writeFileSync(pidfile, process.pid.toString(), 'ascii');
}

//run your childs here

Also you can send pid as argument in spawn() call

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I start Node.JS from within a native OSX application as a background worker. To make node.js exit when the parent process which consumes node.js stdout dies/exits, I do the following:

// Watch parent exit when it dies

process.stdout.resume();
process.stdout.on('end', function() {
  process.exit();
});

Easy like that, but I'm not exactly sure if it's what you've been asking for ;-)

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