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How can I compare classes in Ruby or in other words how can I translate this Java code into Ruby?

Class<?> clazz = ...;
if (clazz == String.class) {
  ...
} else if (clazz == Integer.class) {
  ...
}

To clarify: I do not want to compare object instances or check if an object is an instance of a class.

EDIT: I do not want to compare object instances or check if an object is an instance of a class, i.e. is_a? and kind_of? don't help me.

share|improve this question
    
I always thought "abcdef".is_a?(String) does the job. Maybe somebody else can chime in. – Wukerplank Apr 6 '11 at 12:24
    
That is_a? checks if an object is of a certain type, but I want to check if two classes are equal. – Daniel Rikowski Apr 6 '11 at 12:33
    
kind_of? is the way to go. – nornagon Apr 6 '11 at 12:33
    
According to the Ruby docs, kind_of? also works on instances, i.e. String.kind_of?(String) doesn't work. – Daniel Rikowski Apr 6 '11 at 12:38
2  
You can just compare classes with the equality operator, but I have no idea why you're trying to "compare classes": String == Integer # false or String == String #true – meagar Apr 6 '11 at 17:57
up vote 16 down vote accepted

The literal translation of your Java code would be something like

klass = ...

if klass == String
  ...
elsif klass == Integer
  ...
end

Or, more idiomatically

klass = ...

case
when klass == String
  ...
when klass == Integer
  ...
end

Or maybe

klass = ...

DISPATCH_TABLE = {
  String => -> { ... },
  Integer => -> { ... }
}

DISPATCH_TABLE[klass].()

However, Ruby is an object-oriented language, and in an object-oriented language this simply doesn't make sense. You would instead just write

class String
  def do_something
    ...
  end
end

class Integer
  def do_something
    ...
  end
end

and the language will perform the dispatching for you. This is called polymorphism and is supported by pretty much every object-oriented language and many non-object-oriented ones as well.

This particular transformation is one of the fundamental Refactorings described in Martin Fowler's book (p. 255), it is called the Replace Conditional With Polymorphism Refactoring.

The biggest problem with providing a sensible solution to your problem is that you don't tell us what the problem is. You only tell us what the solution is. Or, more precisely, you tell us what you think the solution is in Java, and you somehow expect that the solution in Ruby would be exactly 100% identical, even though the languages couldn't be more different.

To provide a good solution, we need to know the problem first. In other words: the most relevant parts of your question are the s

share|improve this answer
>> "foo".class == String #=> true

Ruby also has is_a?/kind_of?:

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Object.html#M001033

If you want to do several comparisons you should know that classes also work in case statements

klass = case obj
  when String then ...
  when Fixnum then ...
end

Genereally I'd be a bit wary of code like this though, idiomatic Ruby heavily relies on duck typing.

share|improve this answer
    
-1. The OP explicitly states that he does not want to check whether an object is an instance of a class, which is what both of your code examples are doing. The OP wants to compare classes themselves (for whatever reason). – Jörg W Mittag Apr 6 '11 at 12:57
1  
The OP added the edit after my answer and also after he accepted my answer. So much for that... – Michael Kohl Apr 6 '11 at 13:04
2  
The edit is literally just cut&pasted from the sentence directly before it. I don't see how it changes the question. The only difference is that in the original sentence the "not" emphasized using italics and in the edit it is emphasized using boldface. – Jörg W Mittag Apr 6 '11 at 13:08
>> "foo".class == "bar".class
true
share|improve this answer

In Ruby, all classes objects are instances of the Class class. The names of classes are constants that refer to the instance. If you have a reference to the class object, you can compare it with the named constant for that class. So you could do:

if klass == String
  ...
elsif klass == Integer
  ...
end

The expression String.class == Integer.class would be true, since the class of both classes is, of course, Class.

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