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What would be the best way to write an algorith like:

if (a) {
  doA();
  done();
}
else if (b) {
  doB();
  done();
}
else if (c) {
  doC();
  done();
}

another approach I thought:

done = true;
if (a) {
  doA();
}
else if (b) {
  doB();
}
else if (c) {
  doC();
}
else {
  done = false;
}
if (done) {
  done();
}

Which is better? Is there another best approach?

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1  
Using a switch statement or even better polymorphic/overload language features seems way to go. –  LumpN Apr 6 '11 at 13:39

6 Answers 6

Without any context, the most natural looking way for me is:

bool do_it(int condition)
{
    switch (condition)
    {
        case a: doA(); return true;
        case b: doB(); return true;
        case c: doC(); return true;
        default: return false;
    }
}

// ...

if (do_it) done();

since it abstracts the logic of "if this whole stuff succeeds, then do call done()".

But there are many other ways to do this. Especially, if the number of conditions will likely grow in the future, I wouldn't do that at all.

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Depends on how many conditions/actions are there and kind of language you are using.

OOP and polymorphysm could work nicely.

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Use a switch statement, setting an isDone flag along the way, and call done() based on the flag.

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I dont think switch will work with different conditions. In some languages. –  Euphoric Apr 6 '11 at 13:46
    
Yeah, it's language specific, but the syntax suggests a C derivative language... –  BrandonZeider Apr 6 '11 at 13:48
    
Especialy in c-like languages switch can be only used to compare one variable to multiple possible values. No complex conditions. –  Euphoric Apr 6 '11 at 13:50
    
Nothing in his example makes me think a switch won't work. If he can't use a switch, then that's ok, it was just a suggestion, I'm not saying it's the ONLY way to do it? –  BrandonZeider Apr 6 '11 at 13:58

If a,b and c are different complex conditional expressions then your first solution is the best. Maybe you can avoid the "else if" elements if this code is inside a function, like that:

private void doit() {
    if (a) {
        doA();
        done();
        return;
    }
    if (b) {
        doB();
        done();
        return;
    }
    if (c) {
        doC();
        done();
        return;
    }
}

So for me it is much more a code style question.

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I would write it as

var failed = false;
if (a) doA();
else if (b) doB();
else if (c) doC();
else failed = true;
if (!failed) done();

I don't like setting a variable like done first to true and later undoing it, because the work is not done before the conditional starts, so it looks illogical.

I also don't like the switch case option because the conditions 'a', 'b', 'c' are not necessarily mutually exclusive; the if ... else if ... else cascade supports non-exclusive conditions but switch() might not depending on the language. E.g. you can't convert cascading if ... else's to switch in C++.

I think it's definitely important to remove multiple call points to done() because that's redundancy and later a maintenance issue if done() e.g. gets parameters.

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First, have one condition variable, not three. Second, I'd use a map of function pointers, with the condition variable as the key. Here's an example:

#!/usr/bin/env python

def doA():
    pass
def doB():
    pass
def doC():
    pass
def done():
    pass

a = 3
b = 6
c = 8

doers = {}
doers[a] = doA
doers[b] = doB
doers[c] = doC
condition = a

# this is now the entire "algorithm":

if condition in doers:
    doers[condition]()
    done()
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