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I'm using the following code to transform a big xml stream to another stream:

 import java.io.ByteArrayInputStream;
 import java.io.InputStreamReader;
 import java.io.OutputStreamWriter;
 import java.io.PrintWriter;
 import java.io.Writer;
 import javax.xml.stream.XMLEventReader;
 import javax.xml.stream.XMLEventWriter;
 import javax.xml.stream.XMLInputFactory;
 import javax.xml.stream.XMLOutputFactory;
 import javax.xml.stream.XMLStreamException;
 import javax.xml.stream.XMLStreamReader;
 import javax.xml.stream.events.XMLEvent;
 import javax.xml.transform.Result;
 import javax.xml.transform.Source;
 import javax.xml.transform.Transformer;
 import javax.xml.transform.TransformerFactory;
 import javax.xml.transform.stax.StAXResult;
 import javax.xml.transform.stax.StAXSource;

 public class TryMe 
 {
   public static void main (final String[] args)
   {
    XMLInputFactory inputFactory = null;
    XMLEventReader eventReaderXSL = null;
    XMLEventReader eventReaderXML = null;
    XMLOutputFactory outputFactory = null;
    XMLEventWriter eventWriter = null;
    Source XSL = null;
    Source XML = null;
    inputFactory = XMLInputFactory.newInstance();
    outputFactory = XMLOutputFactory.newInstance();
    inputFactory.setProperty("javax.xml.stream.isSupportingExternalEntities", Boolean.TRUE);
    inputFactory.setProperty("javax.xml.stream.isNamespaceAware", Boolean.TRUE);
    inputFactory.setProperty("javax.xml.stream.isReplacingEntityReferences", Boolean.TRUE);
    try
    {
        eventReaderXSL = inputFactory.createXMLEventReader("my_template",
                new InputStreamReader(TryMe.class.getResourceAsStream("my_template.xsl")));
        eventReaderXML = inputFactory.createXMLEventReader("big_one", new InputStreamReader(
                TryMe.class.getResourceAsStream("big_one.xml")));
    }
    catch (final javax.xml.stream.XMLStreamException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

    // get a TransformerFactory object
    final TransformerFactory transfFactory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();

    // define the Source object for the stylesheet
    try
    {
        XSL = new StAXSource(eventReaderXSL);
    }
    catch (final javax.xml.stream.XMLStreamException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }
    Transformer tran2 = null;
    // get a Transformer object
    try
    {

        tran2 = transfFactory.newTransformer(XSL);
    }
    catch (final javax.xml.transform.TransformerConfigurationException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

    // define the Source object for the XML document
    try
    {
        XML = new StAXSource(eventReaderXML);
    }
    catch (final javax.xml.stream.XMLStreamException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

    // create an XMLEventWriter object
    try
    {

        eventWriter = outputFactory.createXMLEventWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(System.out));
    }
    catch (final javax.xml.stream.XMLStreamException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

    // define the Result object
    final Result XML_r = new StAXResult(eventWriter);

    // call the transform method
    try
    {

        tran2.transform(XML, XML_r);
    }
    catch (final javax.xml.transform.TransformerException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

    // clean up
    try
    {
        eventReaderXSL.close();
        eventReaderXML.close();
        eventWriter.close();
    }
    catch (final javax.xml.stream.XMLStreamException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }
}

}

my_template is something like this:

<xsl:stylesheet version = '1.0' 
     xmlns:xsl='http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform'>

<xsl:preserve-space elements="*"/>

<xsl:template match="@*|node()">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>


<xsl:template match="@k8[parent::point]">
  <xsl:attribute name="k8">
    <xsl:value-of select="'xxxxxxxxxxxxxx'"/>
  </xsl:attribute>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

and xml is a long long list of

<data>
  <point .... k8="blablabla" ... ></point>
  <point .... k8="blablabla" ... ></point>
  <point .... k8="blablabla" ... ></point>
  ....
  <point .... k8="blablabla" ... ></point>
</data>

If i use an identity transformer (using tranfsFactory.newTransformer() instead of transFactory(XSL) ) while the input stream is processed the output is produced. Instead with my template there's no way.. The transformer reads all the input and then starts to produce the output (with a large stream of course very often an out of memory comes before a result.

Any Idea?? i'm freaking out.. i can't understand what's wrong in my code/xslt

Many thanks in advance!!

share|improve this question
    
maybe you miss an information: I generate the xslt dinamically and changes depending user runtime needs. This snippet is just a proof of concept of my code. Anyway it reproduces perfectly the problem –  SpeTIX Apr 7 '11 at 7:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using XSLT is probably not the best approach, as others have pointed out your solution requires that the processor reads the entire document into memory before writing out the output. You might wish to consider using a SAX parser to sequentially read in each node, perform any transformation required (using a data driven mapping if necessary) and write out the transformed data. This avoids the requirement to create an entire document tree in memory and could enable significantly faster processing as you're not attempting to build a complex document to write out.

Ask yourself if the output format is simple and stable, and then reconsider the use of XSLT. For large datasets of regular data, you might also wish to consider if XML is a good file format for transferring information.

share|improve this answer

Well XSLT 1.0 and 2.0 operate on a tree data model of the complete XML so XSLT 1.0 and 2.0 processors usually read the complete XML input document into a tree and create a result tree that is then serialized. You seem to assume that using StAX changes the behaviour of XSLT but I don't think that is the case, the XSLT processor builds the tree as the stylessheet could require complex XPath navigator like preceding or preceding-sibling.

However as you use Java you could look into Saxon 9.3 and its experimental XSLT 3.0 streaming support, that way you should not run out of memory when processing very large XML input documents.

The part in your XSLT that is unusual is <xsl:template match="@k8[parent::point]">, that is usually simply written as <xsl:template match="point/@k8"> but you would need to test with your XSLT processor whether that changes performance.

share|improve this answer
    
even with a template containing only this the output starts after the reader finished: <xsl:template match="@*|node()"> <xsl:copy> <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/> </xsl:copy> </xsl:template> –  SpeTIX Apr 7 '11 at 7:28
    
Changing your stylesheet does not change the fact that the processer will read the entire input document into memory before starting the transform. Changing your stylesheet might make the transformation more efficient, but doesn't change that fundamental. –  sudocode Apr 8 '11 at 8:27
    
saxon is not free and has a license cost that i can't justify for my "simple" task –  SpeTIX Apr 13 '11 at 12:15

The transformer reads all the input and then starts to produce the output (with a large stream of course very often an out of memory comes before a result.

Any Idea?

If you are finding that it takes too long for this work to complete, then you need to redesign your approach to your task to avoid reading in the entire input file before you start to process the output file. There is nothing that can be tweaked with your code to make it magically faster - you need to address the core of your algorithm.

share|improve this answer

How complex is the transformation you are doing with XSL? Could you make the same transformation using StAX alone?

With StAX it is quite easy to write a parser to match a particular node and then to insert, alter or remove nodes in the output stream you are writing to at that point. So instead of using XSL for the transform, you could maybe use StAX alone. This way you benefit from the streaming nature of the API (not buffering large tree in memory) and so there will be no memory issue.

Co-incidentally, this recent answer to another question might help you with that.

share|improve this answer
    
well the idea was to have a general purpose engine mainly because the attributes i want to match change depending on the xml contents and user needs. Moreover i use it also to produce csv from xml.. Of course if i create my own parser it works, but i have to write a class instead of a xsl stylesheet and i can't do it on the flight.. –  SpeTIX Apr 7 '11 at 7:34
    
Why not write a properly data driven class, rather than an xsl stylesheet? If your input is generally of the form Some_Attribute of Some_node, then it's pretty straightforward to express the desired relationship in data other than xsl. –  AndyT Apr 7 '11 at 11:23
    
attributes i'm going to filter are not known at compile time.. i build up an xslt sheet on the fly and then i use it to transform my input stream.. anyway i discovered i can efficently use sax without the need of a stylesheet to successfully parse it. –  SpeTIX Apr 13 '11 at 12:17

As others have pointed, using Stax won't change the way XSLT is working : It reads first everything before starting any work. If you need to work with very large files, you'll have to use something other than XSLT.

Then are different options:

share|improve this answer

Try apache xsltc for better performance - it uses code generation to simply transforms.

Your XSLt transform looks really simple, and so does your input format - surely you can do StAX/SAX manual processing and gain a really good performance increase.

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