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How can I do this in git:

My current branch is branch1 and I have made some local changes. However I now realize that I actually meant to be applying these changes to branch2. Is there a way to apply/merge these changes so that they become local changes on branch2 without committing them on branch1?

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There is a great Git Tutorial right here on SO. Its kind of a central for all git questions on stack overflow. –  Decio Lira Feb 17 '09 at 14:11
11  
LoL I always make this mistake –  Pineapple Under the Sea Aug 5 '12 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 300 down vote accepted

Since your files are not yet committed in branch1:

git stash
git checkout branch2
git stash pop

or

git stash
git checkout branch2
git stash list       # to check the various stash made in different branch
git stash apply x    # to select the right one
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Thanks - that's exactly what I was looking for –  solsberg Feb 17 '09 at 14:44
2  
You are welcome. More examples of stash usage at unethicalblogger.com/posts/2008/11/… . –  VonC Feb 17 '09 at 14:59
    
If you are looking for a solution to the same issue but with TFS, the equivalent solution is to shelve your changes then use TFS Power Tools to unshelve to the correct branch using the /migrate switch. –  xr280xr Nov 12 '12 at 20:28
    
This worked for me. However, I also had to create a local branch for the 'stash pop' to work. Checkout out stackoverflow.com/questions/1783405/git-checkout-remote-branch if something similar is happening to you. –  mimoralea Aug 22 '13 at 15:27
    
This does not work for me. If I make a set of changes accidentally on master, and they are uncommited, but I wanted to apply them to other branch develop, if I try git stash then it will not allow me to checkout develop. –  EMS Apr 11 at 21:07

Stashing, temporary commits and rebasing may all be overkill. If you haven't added the changed files to the index, yet, then you may be able to just checkout the other branch.

git checkout branch2

This will work so long as no files that you are editing are different between branch1 and branch2. It will leave you on branch2 with you working changes preserved. If they are different then you can specify that you want to merge your local changes with the changes introduced by switching branches with the -m option to checkout.

git checkout -m branch2

If you've added changes to the index then you'll want to undo these changes with a reset first. (This will preserve your working copy, it will just remove the staged changes.)

git reset
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3  
I thought the stash "simpler" somehow to understand, but your approach is better at taking into account the working directory across different branches. +1 –  VonC Feb 17 '09 at 21:13
2  
A plain traditional checkout seemed more appropriate to the problem in hand. checkout is lighter weight, it just updates the files that need to change. Perhaps it's easier to understand the stash approach, or it may just be that it's not obvious enough that checkout is 'safe' in this use case. –  Charles Bailey Feb 17 '09 at 21:41
    
If checkout -m isn't "safe" in some situation (maybe it would cause a merge conflict), would stash provide any advantage (e.g. can you unpop a stash pop)? –  Craig McQueen Oct 18 '12 at 6:25
    
@craigMcQueen You can't unpop a popped stash but stash would complain about conflicts when you pop it. You can fix the conflicts and then commit, but the original stash is still on the stack in this case ! :) –  Shaun F Mar 9 '13 at 0:22

The answers given so far are not ideal because they require a lot of needless work resolving merge conflicts, or they make too many assumptions which are frequently false. This is how to do it perfectly. The link is to my own site.

How to Commit to a Different Branch in git

You have uncommited changes on my_branch that you want to commit to master, without committing all the changes from my_branch.

Example

git merge master
git stash -u
git checkout master
git stash apply
git reset
git add example.js
git commit
git checkout .
git clean -f -d
git checkout my_branch
git merge master
git stash pop

Explanation

Start by merging master into your branch, since you'll have to do that eventually anyway, and now is the best time to resolve any conflicts.

The -u option (aka --include-untracked) in git stash -u prevents you from losing untracked files when you later do git clean -f -d within master.

After git checkout master it is important that you do NOT git stash pop, because you will need this stash later. If you pop the stash created in my_branch and then do git stash in master, you will cause needless merge conflicts when you later apply that stash in my_branch.

git reset unstages everything resulting from git stash apply. For example, files that have been modified in the stash but do not exist in master get staged as "deleted by us" conflicts.

git checkout . and git clean -f -d discard everything that isn't committed: all changes to tracked files, and all untracked files and directories. They are already saved in the stash and if left in master would cause needless merge conflicts when switching back to my_branch.

The last git stash pop will be based on the original my_branch, and so will not cause any merge conflicts. However, if your stash contains untracked files which you have committed to master, git will complain that it "Could not restore untracked files from stash". To resolve this conflict, delete those files from your working tree, then git stash pop, git add ., and git reset.

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If it were about committed changes, you should have a look at git-rebase, but as pointed out in comment by VonC, as you're talking about local changes, git-stash would certainly be the good way to do this.

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I do not understand this solution: it would rewrite commit history of branch2 from branch1... why getting all committed changes from branch1 in branch2 when we only want to get local non-committed changes of branch1 in branch2 ?... –  VonC Feb 17 '09 at 14:24
    
@VonC : agreed, in this case, the rebase gets all committed changes since last merge between branches into branch1. I didn't get the "non-committed" parameter of this question at first. rebase isn't the good answer. –  claf Feb 17 '09 at 14:34
    
@claferri: pfew... I was beginning to have an headache ;) I would have downvoted your answer, but since I had myself published one, there was a "clear conflict of interest". With your updated post, I do not have to downvote at all now. Thanks :) –  VonC Feb 17 '09 at 14:56
    
@VonC : next time, feel free to down vote as long as my answer is as wrong as this one ;) –  claf Feb 17 '09 at 15:01

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