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I am thinking about how to use Linq in the classic 3-tier archetecture of .net project. Apprently, Linq to SQL should appear in Data tier. The reason I choose Linq is because it will save me much time on code than using store procedure. I did some search on line about the insert/update/delete method of Linq, but didn't find an appropriate method for record update using entities. Usually, people will do update using this way:

    public void UpdateUser(String username, String password, int userId) 
    {      
          using (var db = new UserDataContext()){
             var user = db.user.Single(p => p.Id = userId);
             user.Username = username;          
             user.Password = password;          
             db.SubmitChanges();      
           } 
    } 

Why we don't use entity to pass the record like this:

public void Update(Application info)
{
    VettingDataContext dc = new VettingDataContext(_connString);
    var query = (from a in dc.Applications
                 where a.Id==info.Id
                 select a).First();
    query = info;
    try{
        dc.SubmitChanges();
        }
    catch(Exception e){
       //...
        }
 }

But unfortunately, the above code is wrong because of "query=info", but if I assign each value from "info" to "query", it works fine. like

query.firstName=info.firstName;
query.lastName=info.lastName;

So if this table have 40 fields, I have to write 40 lines code. Is there any easier way to do the update? Hope I describe this issue clearly.

share|improve this question
    
isn't a foreach enough? –  Bastardo Apr 6 '11 at 15:52
    
Are the info and query objects of same type? What is the error that you are getting? –  WorldIsRound Apr 6 '11 at 15:57
    
Of out interest - why is Linq to SQL a data-tier thing? I would have said that the database itself and Linq to SQL itself were the data tier; ? –  Kieren Johnstone Apr 6 '11 at 16:02
    
what tier do you think it should be? –  Steven Zack Apr 6 '11 at 18:36
    
The business logic tier - because it's invoking data access calls. E.g. a method CreateCustomer might use several LINQ-to-SQL calls to look up a default, create a customer, create an account, .. LINQ-to-SQL being the DAL –  Kieren Johnstone Apr 7 '11 at 7:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Adding another answer as a comment was not sufficient to expand on my previous answer.

Lets take a step back and look at what you want to do here from a logical perspective. You want to tell your data access layer how it should update the database, with all the new/changed values it needs to write.

One very common way of doing this is to pass an entity which has those changes (which is what you're doing in your example). This can become tricky, as you have seen, because if you simply overwrite the entity variable with the changed entity, Linq2Sql will lose change tracking... just because the new entity is assigned to the same variable, doesn't mean that Linq2Sql automatically picks up changes from the new object... in fact Linq2Sql has no knowledge of the new object at all...

Example:

// In domain layer:
MyEntity entity = new MyEntity();
entity.PrimaryKey = 10;
entity.Name = "Toby Larone";
entity.Age = 27;

myDataRepository.Update(entity);

// In data layer:
void Update(MyEntity changedEntity)
{
    using (var db = new DataContext())
    {
        var entity = (from e in db.MyEntities
                      where e.PrimaryKey == changedEntity.PrimaryKey
                      select e).First();

        // Linq2Sql now has change tracking of "entity"... any changes made will be persisted when SubmitChanges is called...

        entity = changedEntity;

        // Linq2Sql does **not** have change tracking of changedEntity - the fact that it has been assigned to the same variable that once stored a tracked entity does not mean that Linq2Sql will magically pick up the changes...

        db.SubmitChanges(); // Nothing happens - as far as Linq2Sql is concerned, the entity that was selected in the first query has not been changed (only the variable in this scope has been changed to reference a different entity).
    }
}

Now you've already seen that assigning each field to the entity rather than replacing it works as intended - this is because the changes are being made to the original entity, which is still inside the Linq2Sql change tracking system..

One possible solution to this problem would be to write a method that "applies" the changes of another Entity to an existing one, ie:

partial class MyEntity
{
    void ApplyChanges(MyEntity changedEntity)
    {
        this.PrimaryKey = changeEntity.PrimaryKey;
        this.Name = changedEntity.Name;
        this.Age = changedEntity.Age;
    }
}

and then your data access would look like this:

// In data layer:
void Update(MyEntity changedEntity)
{
    using (var db = new DataContext())
    {
        var entity = (from e in db.MyEntities
                      where e.PrimaryKey == changedEntity.PrimaryKey
                      select e).First();

        // Linq2Sql now has change tracking of "entity"... any changes made will be persisted when SubmitChanges is called...

        entity.ApplyChanges(changedEntity);

        db.SubmitChanges(); // Works OK...
    }
}

But im sure you don't like this solution - because all you have done is effectively move the repetitive field assignment out of the repository and into the Entity class itself...

Going back to the logical perspective - all you really need to do is tell the data access repository 2 things - 1) which record you want to update and 2) what the changes are. Sending an entirely new entity which encapsulates those two requirements is not necessary to achieve that goal, in fact I think it's very inefficient.

In the following example, you are sending the data repository only the changes, not an entire entity. Becuase there is no entity, there are no change tracking issues to work around

Example:

// In domain layer:
myDataRepository.Update(10, entity =>
{
    entity.Name = "Toby Larone";
    entity.Age = 27;
});

// In data layer:
void Update(int primaryKey, Action<MyEntity> callback)
{
    using (var db = new DataContext())
    {
        var entity = (from e in db.MyEntities
                      where e.PrimaryKey == primaryKey
                      select e).First();

        // Linq2Sql now has change tracking of "entity"... any changes made will be persisted when SubmitChanges is called...

        // The changes that were sent are being applied directly to the Linq2Sql entity, which is already under change tracking...
        callback(entity);

        db.SubmitChanges();
    }
}

In the previous examples, the field assignments were happening twice - once when you described the changes you wanted to make, and again in the data repository when you needed to apply those changes to a Linq2Sql change tracked entity.

Using the callback, the field assignments only happen once - the description of the change itself is what updates the tracked entity.

I hope I explained this well enough :)

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you so much man! With Linq, I think 3 tiers archetecture has to be modified to two tiers. So in your example,domain layer is the combination of presentation layer and business layer, right? –  Steven Zack Apr 7 '11 at 15:01
    
not necessarily, the code that passes the callback to the data repository could be anywhere, although the best place would be in the layer directly above the data layer (usually domain layer) :) –  MattDavey Apr 7 '11 at 15:29

Think about what the data repository actually requires in order to perform the update. It does not require an object that contains those changes, but a description of what changes need to be made. This can be encapsulated easily into a callback delegate...

public void UpdateUser(int userId, Action<User> callback)
{
    using (var db = new DataContext())
    {
        User entity = db.Users.Where(u => u.Id == userId).Single();

        callback(entity);

        db.SubmitChanges();
    }
}

myrepository.UpdateUser(userId, user =>
{
    user.Username = username;
    user.Password = password;
    // etc...
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply, I'd like to discuss it in details. In my data tier, what parameter I passed is an entity object which is the same as the table model. In the "VettingDataContext", there is a table called application. I collect all the property value of application model into "info", then I passed it to data tier via business tier in order to update database. I wonder how to avoid write bunch of code just to assign value to the selected record and submit changes. In your solution, I still have to write user.Username = username; user.Password = password; Is there a way to avoid this? –  Steven Zack Apr 6 '11 at 18:33
1  
I think that's the best method I've ever seen in LINQ programming :) –  djechelon Apr 7 '11 at 8:35
    
@steven: you ALWAYS have to write user.Username = username somewhere. In a non-structured architecture (ie you don't have tiers but all code in one place) you still have to set that property, even if you just retrieve the object and store it again. The difference here is that the data tier accepts a callback of actions done onto the user class, which is presumably passed as argument by a controller class (in MVC pattern), so you write that code as method parameter rather than pure execution code, and the result is the same.... –  djechelon Apr 7 '11 at 8:38
1  
... by the way, I would suggest paying attention about callbacks as public method arguments for security reasons. If you want to provide SDK to external developers, it is risky to allow executable code as public method's argument of course, because of direct code injection. Mine was just a note... if your software doesn't have external hooks you can freely use this approach on your data layer, but just remember that ;) –  djechelon Apr 7 '11 at 8:40
    
Yea, you are right. Thanks to both of you! –  Steven Zack Apr 7 '11 at 14:03

query is not the same type as info. They may have the same properties to you, but the code doesn't know that.

Now, if you want to avoid writing a bunch of unnecesary code, you can use a third party library like AutoMapper which can do that for you.

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