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Greetings again,

I have this problem again on C but now using struct. Having this structure of student

struct student {
   char *name;
   int age;
}

I wanted to a list where I could add a number of Student and can also view all of its elements. Here's the code I have done so far.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
// struct student ...
void add(student **list, char* name, int age) {
   student* temp = (student *)malloc(sizeof(student));
   temp->name = name
   temp->age = age;
   *list = temp;
   *(list++) = (student *)malloc(sizeof(student));
}
void view(student **list) {
   student* data = *list;
   while(data != '\0') { printf("%s%i", data->name, data->age); *(data++); }
}
main() {
   student* list = (student *)malloc(sizeof(student));
   char* name = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char));
   int age=0;
   // inputs for name and age
   // do-while(option != EXIT_VALUE);
   // inside do-while are the following below
   add(&list, name, age);
   view(&list);
}

I only get the newest student upon the view method.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried running your code step-by-step in a debugger? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 6 '11 at 15:53
    
I'm getting an error on the line of printf on the view –  Cyril Horad Apr 6 '11 at 15:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It makes sense, since you are allocation space for 1 single student structure:

student* list = (student *)malloc(sizeof(student));

You should do something like:

int list_size = 20;
student* list = (student *)malloc(sizeof(student) * list_size);

The name variable suffers from the same problem.

A dynamic linked list should have a reference to the next and previous elements. You'll have to change your program to work with:

struct student {
   char *name;
   int age;
   struct student* next;
   struct student* previous;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The linked-list is being grown in the add() function... –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 6 '11 at 15:54
    
This makes the list to a limit of list_size elements. How can I make it limitless? Should I invoke another struct, struct list { student* data; student* next; }? –  Cyril Horad Apr 6 '11 at 15:54
1  
@Oli Then that is even worst, because he is loosing the reference to the first malloced structure. This means a memory leak. –  karlphillip Apr 6 '11 at 15:55
1  
@Oli, nonsense. It's not a linked list. How could it be, without a next or previous pointer? –  Matthew Flaschen Apr 6 '11 at 15:55
    
@Matthew: Yes, you're right! Complete reading error on my part. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 6 '11 at 15:57

Also you are doing *(data++) which isn't necessary. data++ is just fine. You really shouldn't be needing the double pointers everywhere, it only complicates things. For allocation, fine (if you think that's the best way), but for passing to other functions that only READ the pointer, there's no need.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting an non-lvalue in unary '&' error –  Cyril Horad Apr 6 '11 at 16:01
    
Gonna need some code here, no idea what that looks like. –  Chris Apr 6 '11 at 16:05

view expects list to be an array (null-terminated) of pointers to student. However, you allocate it in main as a pointer to a single student. Then, you just reassign that student pointer every time you call add. As Chris said, it would probably be fine (and simpler) just to have a list of students.

share|improve this answer

If you want to implement the list as an array, you need a strategy to re-allocate the list when it gets larger than the initial array size. A typical strategy is to choose an arbitrary size that will handle most cases without wasting tons of memory, and then double that amount when the bound is reached. So, say you start with an 8-element list. When you add the 9th element, it would reallocate the array to a 16-element list.

The other strategy is to use a linked list, where you add a struct pointer (typically named "next") to your structure and use that to iterate through your list. This makes allocation and traversal a lot simpler, although list retrieval becomes an O(n) operation instead of an O(1) operation, which means it takes longer to get a particular element from the list as the list gets larger.

share|improve this answer

You have two options.

  1. Create linked list and you will be able to insert as many students you want. (each student has also pointer on next student if any else it is NULL)

  2. Create array of pointers on students as suggested by karlphillip, but method to add new student will need to implement position searching or storing this postion. (you have to figure out where should you store pointer that points on student)

share|improve this answer

I only get the newest student upon the view method.

void add(student **list, char* name, int age) {
   student* temp = (student *)malloc(sizeof(student));
   temp->name = name
   temp->age = age;
   *list = temp;
   *(list++) = (student *)malloc(sizeof(student));
}

Notice that you are making list point to the newly allocated memory location. The previous value it was pointing to is lost and also causes memory leak. And so only you are getting the last entry. You need to implement a linked list like structure.


struct student {
   char *name;
   int age;

   struct student *next ;
}

// ....

void add(student **list, char* name, int age) {
   // Make sure that every new location is saved in next
   // And also the next time when you call this method, it should be
   // location of "next" pointing to being passed as parameter.      
}

int main()
{
    student *list = malloc(sizeof(student));  // No need to type cast malloc

    student *preserveHeadNode = list ;

    add(&list, name, age);

    // .. While viewing pass the "preserveHeadNode" and run the loop until
    //    student::next == NULL

}
share|improve this answer
    
So meaning in the struct student, I should add student* next? –  Cyril Horad Apr 6 '11 at 15:57
    
@Cryil Horad - Yes, but should preserve the head node of the list. And add just add the memnber student *next; to the struct and update the newly added location to it. –  Mahesh Apr 6 '11 at 16:00

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