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I'm trying to design a database for a product aggregator. Each product has information about where it comes from, what it costs, what type of thing it is, price, color, etc. Users need to able to search and filter results based on any of those product categories. I also expect to have a large number of users. My initial thought was having one big table with every product in it with a column for each piece of information and an index on anything I need to be able to search by but I think this might be inefficient with a lot of users pounding on this one table. My other thought was to organize the database to promote a tree-like navigation of tables but because you can search by anything I'm not sure how I would organize the tables.

Any thoughts on some good practices?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One table of products - databases are designed to have lots of users pounding on tables.

(from the comments)

You need to model your data. This comes from looking at the all the data you have, determining what is related to what (a table is called a relation because all the attributes in a row are related to a candidate key). You haven't really given enough information about the scope of what data (unstructured?) you have on these products and how it varies. Are you going to have difficulties because Shoes have brand, model, size and color, but Desks only have brand, model and finish? All this is going to inform your data model. Typically you have one products table, and other things link to it.

Some of those attributes will be foreign keys to lookup tables, others (price) would be simple scalars. Appropriate indexing and you'll be fine. For advanced analytics, consider a dimensionally modeled star-schema, but perhaps not for your live transaction system - depends what your data flow/workflow/transactions are. Or consider some benefits of its principles in your transactional database. Ralph Kimball is source of good information on dimensional modeling.

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That was my initial thought, my partners disagreed with me. Any other tips? –  JPC Apr 6 '11 at 15:54
    
@JPC: Did your partners present compelling reasons for their positions? –  David Apr 6 '11 at 15:54
    
@JPC: Oh? Did they have any better suggestions? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 6 '11 at 15:55
    
Not super compelling. Other suggestion was to set up a tree like structure of tables –  JPC Apr 6 '11 at 15:56
1  
@JPC Then one table. How many products are we talking about? 1k, 100k, 1m, 100m? Some of those attributes will be foreign keys to lookup tables, others (price) would be simple scalars. Appropriate indexing and you'll be fine. For advanced analytics, consider a dimensionally modeled star-schema, but perhaps not for your live transaction system - depends what your data flow/workflow/transactions are. Or consider some benefits of its principles in your transactional database. Ralph Kimball is source of good information on dimensional modeling. –  Cade Roux Apr 6 '11 at 16:13

I dont see any need for the tree structure here. You can do with single table.

if you insist on tree structure with hierarchy here is an example to get you started.

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For text based search, and ease of startup & design, I strongly recommend Apache SOLR. The SOLR API is easy to use (especially JSON). Databases do text search poorly, and I would instead recommend that you just make sure that they respond to primary/unique key queries properly, and those are the fields you should index.

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I'll look into that, thanks! –  JPC Apr 6 '11 at 15:57
    
Make sure you spend lots of time on the faceting piece, something that kind of auto-creates a browse system. –  Horus Apr 6 '11 at 16:09

One table for the products, and another table for the product category hierarchy (you don't specifically say you have this but "tree-like navigation of tables" makes me think you might).

I can see you might be concerned about over-indexing causing problems if you plan to index almost every column. In that case, it might be best to index on the top 5 or 10 columns you think users are likely to search for, unless it's possible for a user to search on ANY column. In that case you might want to look at building a data warehouse. Maybe you'll want to look into data cubes to see if those will help...?


For hierarchical data, you need a PRODUCT_CATEGORY table looking something like this:

ID
PARENT_ID
NAME

Some sample data:

ID     PARENT_ID     NAME
1                    ROOT
2      1             SOCKS
3      1             HELICOPTER PARTS
4      2             ARGYLE

Some SQL engines (such as Oracle) allow you to write recursive queries to traverse the hierarchy in a single query. In this example, the root of the tree has a PARENT_ID of NULL, but if you don't want this column to be nullable, I've also seen -1 used for the same purposes.

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Can you explain more what a table for product category hierachy would look like? –  JPC Apr 6 '11 at 15:59
    
@JPC: See update. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 6 '11 at 16:03
    
I'm not sure what a data warehouse or data cubes are (or what you mean by them) but I'll definitely look into it, thanks! –  JPC Apr 6 '11 at 16:08
    
That assumes that one navigates in that hierarchy order right? For example, assuming argyle was a color, I might also search by argyle and then get socks and sweaters, etc. So maybe this wouldn't work? –  JPC Apr 6 '11 at 16:15
    
@JPC: In that case you either build multiple hierarchies for each possible search dimension, or get into data cubes, which might do the same thing (I admit it's been a long time since I've worked with this kind of thing, so there might be better ways of dealing with this that I've forgotten). –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 6 '11 at 17:37

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