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I'm developing an app for Mac OS X to display lyric of the song iTunes is playing. I've done some searches and found only the way using AppleScript to realize it. Is there an API for Objective-C that I can use to fetch information about the song from iTunes? I want to know how Bowtie, CoverSutra and Last.fm did it.

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You can communicate via OSA (AppleScript) from within a Cocoa app. –  Paul R Apr 6 '11 at 16:04
    
Objective-C has no API. Do you mean Cocoa or Carbon? –  user142019 Apr 6 '11 at 16:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

(I guess you meant a Cocoa API instead of an Objective-C API.)

See the answer to my question:

Use the Scripting Bridge to ask iTunes. iTunes is even the example that the docs use.

It can be a bit tricky in the beginning, but as always with Cocoa: it's easy after you've done it once.

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Thanks, I'll give it a try. In fact by objective-c, I mean language, to distinguish from AppleScript. –  Allen Hsu Apr 7 '11 at 6:57

In 10.9 you can use iTunes Library Framework (/Library/Frameworks/iTunesLibrary.framework) for iTunes 11.

#import <iTunesLibrary/ITLibrary.h>

NSError *error = nil;
ITLibrary *library = [ITLibrary libraryWithAPIVersion:@"1.0" error:&error];
if (library)
{
        NSArray *playlists = library.allPlaylists; //  <- NSArray of ITLibPlaylist
        NSArray *tracks = library.allMediaItems; //  <- NSArray of ITLibMediaItem
}
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There's no Apple-supplied API that I know of, other than the AppleScript interface.

But it just so happens that iTunes posts distributed notifications whenever the track changes, so you can listen for those and get the currently playing song info that way.

See Objective-C Mac OS X Distributed notifications iTunes

I've never seen any official documentation of these notifications so I don't know if you can count on them working in the future, but they've worked for like the past decade.

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