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I develop in .NET an application that draws some lines. In the middle of a line I need to draw the line direction array.

Have:
(xA, yA, xB, yB) or (pA, pB) - segment AB points
arrWidth, arrHeight - arrow dimensions;
> B - arrow direction.

Need:
3 new points pArr1, pArr2, pArr3 - points of the directional arrow, that should be situated in the middle of the segment AB.

enter image description here

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migrated from math.stackexchange.com Apr 6 '11 at 16:14

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Can you be a bit more clear about what you need? This may not be a mathematics question. –  picakhu Apr 6 '11 at 15:06
    
@picakhu: Updated the drawing –  serhio Apr 6 '11 at 15:13
    
I hope you do realize that your question is still not clear. –  picakhu Apr 6 '11 at 15:14
3  
1. the direction. 2. the size of the arrow. 3. what this has to do with mathematics. –  picakhu Apr 6 '11 at 15:26
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First I'll make some definitions.

let:

  • p = position vector to tail of line
  • v = the line vector
  • h = the arrow height
  • w = the arrow width
  • L = the anti-clockwise rotation by 90 degrees

Then your three points are:

  1. p + (|v|/2 - h/2 + w/2 L) v/|v|
  2. p + (|v|/2 - h/2 - w/2 L) v/|v|
  3. p + (|v|/2 + h/2) v/|v|

Where v/|v| is the unit vector along your line.

In 2 dimensions L is just the mapping (x, y) => (-y, x)

To be more explicit, using the variables in the question, the points above could be written in C# as:

// assuming xA, yA, xB, yB, arrWidth, arrHeight are initialised
var xV = xB - xA;
var yV = yB - yA;
var v = Math.Sqrt(xV*xV + yV*yV);
var pArr1 = new[] {
    xA + xV / 2 - xV * arrHeight / (2 * v) - yV * arrWidth / (2 * v),
    yA + yV / 2 - yV * arrHeight / (2 * v) + xV * arrWidth / (2 * v) };
var pArr2 = new[] {
    xA + xV / 2 - xV * arrHeight / (2 * v) + yV * arrWidth / (2 * v),
    yA + yV / 2 - yV * arrHeight / (2 * v) - xV * arrWidth / (2 * v) };
var pArr3 = new[] {
    xA + xV / 2 + xV * arrHeight / (2 * v),
    yA + yV / 2 + yV * arrHeight / (2 * v) };
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as I am not really mathematician, could you "normalize" your formula, in order to be used by a say, programming language? like using Sin, Cos, etc... –  serhio Apr 6 '11 at 15:41
    
I still don't understand... there is no notion of vector in C#, by eg... could you present it without using vectors? thanks. –  serhio Apr 6 '11 at 15:52
    
That's exactly what the code snippet starting "pArr1 =" was intended for. That should be valid C#, providing pArr1 is declared, and you have initialised px, py, vx, vy, and v to values specified. –  silasdavis Apr 6 '11 at 15:59
1  
With your question variables initialised, this does actually compile under .NET 4 –  silasdavis Apr 6 '11 at 16:16
1  
thank you man, you are a genius! I just replaced the [] par var pArr1 = new Point(, because I am in WPF :) –  serhio Apr 6 '11 at 16:33
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