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Say I've got a Questions and Answer model and I pull all the answers to a specific question.

I can easily do an each_with_index to and figure out what the index or "placement" of an answer is (in relation to the other answers to that specific question).

But, say I want to get a specific answer...how could I still figure out what the index of that answer is in relation to all the other answers associated with a specific question.

Example Answer data:

ID  text      question_id
23  awesome   3
27  boooyah   3
38  snap      3

If I did Answer.find(27) how can I figure out that record is the second item (assuming I'm ordering by ID...though I could order by any field).

share|improve this question
    
is position is really important to you then just add a position column in your table. –  corroded Apr 6 '11 at 17:44
    
But it needs to be dynamic. Like if I do an ORDER BY created_at then that changes the position. I'm not wanting to keep them in a certain order, I'm wanting to find out where in a specific ordering they are. –  Shpigford Apr 6 '11 at 17:45
    
not unless you saved the position in the database like i suggested. if you saved the position, boooyah will always have position 2, no matter what your query was –  corroded Apr 6 '11 at 17:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
class Answer < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :question

  def position(column = 'id', order = 'ASC')
    order_by = "#{column} #{order}"
    arrow = order.capitalize == "ASC" ? "<=" : "=>"
    question.answers.where("#{column} #{arrow} (?)", self.send(column)).order(order_by).count
  end    
end

Answer.find(27).position
Answer.find(27).position("updated_at")
Answer.find(27).position("updated_at", "DESC")
share|improve this answer
    
This would only work for sorting by id. Ordering by something else would have the same effect since you are applying the where('id <= ?', self.id) condition always and then getting the count. –  ctcherry Apr 6 '11 at 18:13
    
yep, my fault . –  fl00r Apr 6 '11 at 18:16
    
Now that will work, and agreed count is more performant. –  ctcherry Apr 6 '11 at 18:23
    
thank you for correction :) –  fl00r Apr 6 '11 at 18:25

Something like this should work, it's not tested but you can see the concept.

class Answer < ActiveRecord::Base

  belongs_to :question

  def placement(ordering_by => 'id ASC')
    question.answers.order(ordering_by).index(self)
  end

end
share|improve this answer
    
using sql count more perfomance efficient –  fl00r Apr 6 '11 at 18:04

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