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What would be the regex to allow digits and a dot? Regarding this \D only allows digits, but it doesn't allow a dot, I need it to allow digits and one dot this is refer as a float value I need to be valid when doing a keyup function in jQuery, but all I need is the regex that only allows what I need it to allow.

This will be in the native of JavaScript replace function to remove non-digits and other symbols (except a dot).

Cheers.

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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you want to allow 1 and 1.2:

(?<=^| )\d+(\.\d+)?(?=$| )

If you want to allow 1, 1.2 and .1:

(?<=^| )\d+(\.\d+)?(?=$| )|(?<=^| )\.\d+(?=$| )

If you want to only allow 1.2 (only floats):

(?<=^| )\d+\.\d+(?=$| )

\d allows digits (while \D allows anything but digits).

(?<=^| ) checks that the number is preceded by either a space or the beginning of the string. (?=$| ) makes sure the string is followed by a space or the end of the string. This makes sure the number isn't part of another number or in the middle of words or anything.

Edit: added more options, improved the regexes by adding lookahead- and behinds for making sure the numbers are standalone (i.e. aren't in the middle of words or other numbers.

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That regular expression will report a match on pretty much anything. For example, in .NET the result of Regex.Replace("xyzzy", @"\d*(\.\d+)?", "!"); will be !x!y!z!z!y!. I'm pretty sure the results in JavaScript will be the same. Since everything's optional, the regex will match at every position. –  Jim Mischel Apr 6 '11 at 19:27
    
@Jim Mischel, good call. I edited the answer with improved regexes. –  Håvard Apr 6 '11 at 19:41
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@[Harpyon] Is there something missing? I get the message "Invalid group": /(?<=^| )\d+(\.\d+)?(?=$| )|(?<=^| )\.\d+(?=$|)/ –  Zesty May 18 '13 at 13:10
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\d*\.\d*

Explanation:

\d* - any number of digits

\. - a dot

\d* - more digits.

This will match 123.456, .123, 123., but not 123

If you want the dot to be optional, in most languages (don't know about jquery) you can use

\d*\.?\d*
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\D is any character except digits. \d is what you mean. –  Francisc Apr 6 '11 at 18:04
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\D is the inverse of "match a digit"-- it will match anything but a digit! –  Platinum Azure Apr 6 '11 at 18:04
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Thank you, @Francisc and @Platinum. I fixed it now. The reason for the mistake is that I copied the \D from the original question. I know in Python \d means "digit" and \D means "anything but a digit", but I thought that if the OP mentioned \D then it must be different in jQuery. According to your comments, apparently my first thought was correct and I should have stuck to it :) –  Ilya Kogan Apr 7 '11 at 3:14
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