Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When my Python script is writing a large amount of logs to a text file line by line using the Python built-in logging library, in my Delphi-powered Windows program I want to effectively read all newly added logs (lines).

  1. When the Python scripting is logging to the file, my Windows program will keep a readonly file handle to that log file;

  2. I'll use the Windows API to get informed when the log file is changed; Once the file is changed, it'll read the newly appended lines.

I'm new to Python, do you see any possible problem with this approach? Does the Python logging lib lock the entire log? Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As ʇsәɹoɈ commented, the standard FileHandler logger does not lock the file, so it should work. However, if for some reason you cannot keep you lock on the file - then I'd recommend having your other app open the file periodically, record the position it's read to and then seek back to that point later. I know the Linux DenyHosts program uses this approach when dealing with log files that it has to monitor for a long period of time. In those situations, simply holding a lock isn't feasible, since directories may move, the file get rotated out, etc. Though it does complicate things in that then you have to store filename + read position in persistent state somewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
Since in the EXE program it has to show the newly added log entries in real time, I'm afraid closing and re-opening the log file will cause performance bottleneck. –  Edwin Yip Apr 7 '11 at 2:45

It depends on the logging handler you use, of course, but as you can see from the source code, logging.FileHandler does not currently create any file locks. By default, it opens files in 'a' (append) mode, so as long as your Windows calls can handle that, you should be fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Good to know that, thanks! –  Edwin Yip Apr 7 '11 at 3:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.