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i have in a procedure which fills a table the following sql

SELECT NVL(SUM(COL1), 0),
       NVL(SUM(COL2), 0)
  INTO v_mytable.COLUMN1,
       v_mytable.COLUMN2
  FROM t1, t2
 WHERE t1.id = t2.id
   AND t1.date = t2.date

also, for 99% of the table rows, those columns = 0 and this query take a long time to be executed when it will return 0 for both columns in most cases.

Is it better to use exception handeling as the following :

BEGIN
  SELECT SUM(COL1),
         SUM(COL2)
    INTO v_mytable.COLUMN1,
         v_mytable.COLUMN2
    FROM t1, t2
   WHERE t1.id = t2.id
     AND t1.date = t2.date
EXCEPTION WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN
  v_mytable.COLUMN1 := 0 ;
  v_mytable.COLUMN2 := 0 ;
END;

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Theoretically, COALESCE should be faster than NVL because the former is executed by the SQL engine and the latter by pl/sql. But I doubt if you could measure the differance, especially since it is only called at the end of the query, not once for each row. Also, see Justin Cave's answer because your code will never raise No Data Found. –  redcayuga Apr 6 '11 at 19:16
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Those two blocks do completely different things. Your SELECT statement would not throw a NO_DATA_FOUND error if COL1 and/or COL2 were always NULL. It would simply put a NULL in v_mytable.COLUMN1 and v_mytable.COLUMN2.

You could do

SELECT SUM(COL1),
       SUM(COL2)
  INTO v_mytable.COLUMN1,
       v_mytable.COLUMN2
  FROM t1, t2
 WHERE t1.id = t2.id
   AND t1.date = t2.date

v_mytable.COLUMN1 := NVL( v_mytable.COLUMN1, 0 );
v_mytable.COLUMN2 := NVL( v_mytable.COLUMN2, 0 );

I wouldn't expect that to be any faster, however.

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Your SQL will run a lot faster if you stop joining the rows for which the col values are 0. Below is a small test to prove my point.

First create two tables with 100,000 rows, where 99% of the rows have their col value set to 0:

SQL> create table t1 (id,date1,col1)
  2  as
  3   select level
  4        , trunc(sysdate)
  5        , case mod(level,100) when 42 then 42 else 0 end
  6     from dual
  7  connect by level <= 100000
  8  /

Table created.

SQL> create table t2 (id,date2,col2)
  2  as
  3   select level
  4        , trunc(sysdate)
  5        , case mod(level,100) when 42 then 84 else 0 end
  6     from dual
  7  connect by level <= 100000
  8  /

Table created.

Give the cost based optimizer table statistics:

SQL> exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'t1')

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'t2')

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

And gather statistics when running queries:

SQL> set serveroutput off
SQL> alter session set statistics_level = all
  2  /

Session altered.

Now your query runs like this:

SQL> SELECT NVL(SUM(t1.COL1), 0)
  2       , NVL(SUM(t2.COL2), 0)
  3    FROM t1
  4       , t2
  5   WHERE t1.id = t2.id
  6     AND t1.date1 = t2.date2
  7  /

NVL(SUM(T1.COL1),0) NVL(SUM(T2.COL2),0)
------------------- -------------------
              42000               84000

1 row selected.

SQL> select * from table(dbms_xplan.display_cursor(null,null,'allstats last'))
  2  /

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SQL_ID  6q5h7h8ht5232, child number 0
-------------------------------------
SELECT NVL(SUM(t1.COL1), 0)      , NVL(SUM(t2.COL2), 0)   FROM t1      , t2  WHERE t1.id = t2.id    AND
t1.date1 = t2.date2

Plan hash value: 446739472

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation           | Name | Starts | E-Rows | A-Rows |   A-Time   | Buffers |  OMem |  1Mem | Used-Mem |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE     |      |      1 |      1 |      1 |00:00:00.37 |     560 |       |       |          |
|*  2 |   HASH JOIN         |      |      1 |    100K|    100K|00:00:00.24 |     560 |  4669K|  1437K| 7612K (0)|
|   3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| T1   |      1 |    100K|    100K|00:00:00.01 |     280 |       |       |          |
|   4 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| T2   |      1 |    100K|    100K|00:00:00.01 |     280 |       |       |          |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   2 - access("T1"."ID"="T2"."ID" AND "T1"."DATE1"="T2"."DATE2")


21 rows selected.

You can see that the HASH JOIN needs to join 100K rows, and this is where most of the time is spent. Now exclude the 0 values:

SQL> SELECT NVL(SUM(t1.COL1), 0)
  2       , NVL(SUM(t2.COL2), 0)
  3    FROM t1
  4       , t2
  5   WHERE t1.id = t2.id
  6     AND t1.date1 = t2.date2
  7     and t1.col1 != 0
  8     and t2.col2 != 0
  9  /

NVL(SUM(T1.COL1),0) NVL(SUM(T2.COL2),0)
------------------- -------------------
              42000               84000

1 row selected.

SQL> select * from table(dbms_xplan.display_cursor(null,null,'allstats last'))
  2  /

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SQL_ID  bjr7wrjx5tjvr, child number 0
-------------------------------------
SELECT NVL(SUM(t1.COL1), 0)      , NVL(SUM(t2.COL2), 0)   FROM t1      , t2  WHERE t1.id = t2.id    AND
t1.date1 = t2.date2    and t1.col1 != 0    and t2.col2 != 0

Plan hash value: 446739472

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation           | Name | Starts | E-Rows | A-Rows |   A-Time   | Buffers |  OMem |  1Mem | Used-Mem |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE     |      |      1 |      1 |      1 |00:00:00.02 |     560 |       |       |          |
|*  2 |   HASH JOIN         |      |      1 |  25000 |   1000 |00:00:00.02 |     560 |  1063K|  1063K| 1466K (0)|
|*  3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| T1   |      1 |  50000 |   1000 |00:00:00.01 |     280 |       |       |          |
|*  4 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| T2   |      1 |  50000 |   1000 |00:00:00.01 |     280 |       |       |          |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   2 - access("T1"."ID"="T2"."ID" AND "T1"."DATE1"="T2"."DATE2")
   3 - filter("T1"."COL1"<>0)
   4 - filter("T2"."COL2"<>0)


23 rows selected.

And you can see that the HASH JOIN now only needs to join 1000 rows, leading to a much faster output.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Rob.

share|improve this answer
    
Additionally, an index on col1/col2 could speed things up even more. –  Martin Schapendonk Apr 7 '11 at 10:19
    
    
Only if you know the values will always be non-negative, then you can rewrite the predicates to col1 > 0 and col2 > 0, in which case you can use an index. –  Rob van Wijk Apr 7 '11 at 11:12
    
OK, I didn't consider negative values. –  Martin Schapendonk Apr 8 '11 at 7:47
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NO_DATA_FOUND would be thrown if no rows were returned, NOT if null values were returned in the actual rows that ARE returned from the query. This would throw NO_DATA_FOUND:

select sysdate
into myVariable
from dual
where 1=0;

This would NOT throw NO_DATA_FOUND:

select null
into myVariable
from dual;

That said, if you simply want to IGNORE the rows where col1 and col2 are null, then you may consider using collections in pl/sql, and use bulk collect into, something like:

select sum(col1) as sum_col1, sum(col2) as sum_col2, col3
bulk collect into v_mytable
FROM t1, t2
 WHERE t1.id = t2.id
   AND t1.date = t2.date
   AND col1 is not null
   AND col2 is not null
GROUP by col3;

No looping, do in one fell swoop. FYI, you would setup v_mytable something like:

declare
  type t_rec is record
  (col1_sum number,
   col2_sum number,
   col3 number);
  v_rec t_rec;

  type t_tab is table of v_rec%type;
  v_mytable t_tab;

begin
...

Later you can loop through v_mytable, which will be only 1% of the original t1,t2 join result (due to the additional not null clauses in query).

Hope that helps.

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Given the choice between these two, I'd go for the first one.

I prefer to use exception handlers for genuine exceptions / errors, not control flow.

YMMV.

share|improve this answer
    
Agree with your point, but in this case using the exception handler doesn't even produce the same result. –  Dave Costa Apr 6 '11 at 20:51
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