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Not sure whether this is possible, but I'm creating a file encoding applcation. When a file is decoded, it is saved temporarily in a temp directory, after which it can be opened regularly. However, I actually need to be certain the file is removed as soon as the application that has opened it, has closed it (e.g. has shut down). Otherwise, the decoded (secret) file is just hanging in the temp directory without supervision.

What's more, even when my application itself has been shut down for any reason, I'd like to pass this task on to Windows, if possible. So say the user decodes a file and opens it and then my application is shut down (either normally or abnormally), the decoded file in the temp directory should still be removed as soon as it's not used anymore.

How would I go about this? I've seen tips like FileSystemWatcher and a trivial 'check every second' idea, but if my application is not alive at the moment the decoded file is closed, I'd still like to have the file removed. So I guess I'd need to pass this responbility to Windows, but I'm not sure if that's possible and if so, how.

So how do I remove a file as soon as it's closed if my application isn't running at that particular moment?

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Windows CreateFile has FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE so there is an OS mechanism to do this automatically for you, assuming you can pass the flag onto the child consumer process. Not sure how to do that in .NET, though - sorry. –  Rup Apr 6 '11 at 18:24
    
@Rup: Thanks. The reason behind this is that the decoded file needs to be able to be opened. If I open a secret .doc file in Microsoft Word, then I need to save the decoded version to disk, then open it. I can't remove it whilst Word is running, as it keeps the file locked. –  pimvdb Apr 6 '11 at 18:25
    
Yeah, sorry, I realised what you were doing straight after posting the comment. –  Rup Apr 6 '11 at 18:29
    
This doesn't slow down an attacker for more than 10 minutes. If disclosure costs a lot of money then you'd better buy some insurance. Hire somebody to tell you how to do it properly. –  Hans Passant Apr 6 '11 at 18:54
    
I must say that this is rather a hobby project. I'm actually playing around on how one could solve this, rather than looking for a professional full-fledged solution. –  pimvdb Apr 6 '11 at 19:46
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Doing this may work:

  1. In the process that creates the file, create it with FileOptions.DeleteOnClose, and with FileShare.ReadWrite (or FileShare.Read if only read access is required from other processes). You may also need FileShare.Delete.
  2. DO NOT let the file close in the main application that created it until the application exits.
  3. In other processes that consume the temporary file, open it with the same file options as the original.

This way, when the last process that has the file open closes, the file will be deleted.

UPDATE:

As noted in the comments, there doesn't seem to be a way in the .NET API to specify both the FIleShare options and the FileOptions.DeleteOnClose. It is possible using straight Win32. I have copied a sample that I tested below. There are 2 programs, one that creates the file, another that consumes it. The only notable difference between the 2 is that the consumer opens the file with OPEN_EXISTING.

Creator

#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN
#include <windows.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    HANDLE fh = CreateFile(
        L"yourFilePath\\tempFile.dat",
        GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE,
        FILE_SHARE_WRITE|FILE_SHARE_READ|FILE_SHARE_DELETE,
        NULL,
        CREATE_NEW,
        FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE,
        NULL);
    if(fh==INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        std::cerr << "Failed to create file. Error code = " << GetLastError() << std::endl;
        return 1;
    }

    std::cout<< "Hit enter to close.";
    std::string inp;
    std::getline(std::cin,inp);

    CloseHandle(fh);


    return 0;
}

Consumer

#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN
#include <windows.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    HANDLE fh = CreateFile(
        L"yourFilePath\\tempFile.dat",
        GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE,
        FILE_SHARE_WRITE|FILE_SHARE_READ|FILE_SHARE_DELETE,
        NULL,
        OPEN_EXISTING,
        FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE,
        NULL);
    if(fh==INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        std::cerr << "Failed to create file. Error code = " << GetLastError() << std::endl;
        return 1;
    }

    DWORD written;
    if(!WriteFile(fh,"Test",4,&written,NULL))
    {
        std::cerr << "Failed to write data to file. Error code = " << GetLastError() << std::endl;
        return 1;
    }


    std::cout<< "Hit enter to close.";
    std::string inp;
    std::getline(std::cin,inp);

    CloseHandle(fh);


    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I might be doing it wrongly, but as long as the file is opened in my application, all other applications show a 'This file is in use by another process' error, hence they can't open it. However, when I close the filestream in my application, the file is deleted. –  pimvdb Apr 6 '11 at 19:45
1  
@pimvdb Interesting, .NET does NOT seem to have a File.Create or File.Open overload to allow both FileOptions and FileShare parameters to be specified. I can get it to work if I use straight Win32. Can you create a managed C++ class that you can call from VB? –  zdan Apr 6 '11 at 21:17
    
I've never done anything in C++, however I'm going to mess around with the win32 API to see if that helps. –  pimvdb Apr 7 '11 at 16:21
    
I used CreateFile in kernel32.dll using FILE_SHARE_READ, but still can't open it, any ideas please? –  pimvdb Apr 7 '11 at 16:51
1  
@pimvdb I added a C++ sample to my answer, it should get you started. After that you'll have to figure out how to stick that code in managed C++ class. –  zdan Apr 7 '11 at 17:34
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Use FileOptions.DeleteOnClose.

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There might be more to it than that, though: I think it's 1) encoder writes temp file 2) encoder spawns child process which reads temp file 3) both processes close in any order 4) delete file. i.e. the delete on close needs to survive the encoder process closing first, and needs not to have deleted the file before the child process has opened it. –  Rup Apr 6 '11 at 18:27
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Things like FileOptions.DeleteOnClose won't help if your media becomes unavailable or the machine gets shut down before the delete occurs. To me this looks very much like an exogenous condition.

Can you stream the decoding to a memory stream rather than to disk and take the whole problem away.

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He wants to then load the file in an external process which is why he's using disk, but I agree this can be defeated. –  Rup Apr 7 '11 at 9:21
    
@Rup there are mechanisms to share memory between processes other than a file. –  Conrad Frix Apr 7 '11 at 18:01
    
Sure, if you control the child process. His example was Word - how would you get Word to load a document from shared memory? You'd have to get your users to install a ram disk and use that. –  Rup Apr 7 '11 at 18:52
    
@Rup Actually that's pretty easy. If you want to push it you could via Office Automation. If you wanted word to consume it you could use VBA to a COM callable wrapper. –  Conrad Frix Apr 8 '11 at 20:28
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