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I want to convert lowercase chars to uppercase as the user types using javascript. Any suggestions are welcome.

I have tried the following:

$("#textbox").live('keypress', function (e) {
    if (e.which >= 97 && e.which <= 122) {
        var newKey = e.which - 32;
        // I have tried setting those
        e.keyCode = newKey;
        e.charCode = newKey;
    }
});
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What are they typing into? If it is an input or a textarea you can hook into the on keydown –  user673289 Apr 6 '11 at 18:59

9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted
$("#textbox").bind('keyup', function (e) {
    if (e.which >= 97 && e.which <= 122) {
        var newKey = e.which - 32;
        // I have tried setting those
        e.keyCode = newKey;
        e.charCode = newKey;
    }

    $("#textbox").val(($("#textbox").val()).toUpperCase());
});
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Using Event.charCode will trigger a warning in JS consoles. That warning being: The 'charCode' property of a keyupevent should not be used. The value is meaningless. I'm not sure why you're using it when you're already using Event.which and Event.keyCode. –  user1385191 Apr 6 '11 at 19:07
    
@MattMcDonald: I just took the code from the example and hoped to answer what the OP wanted. ;) –  Shaz Apr 6 '11 at 19:09
    
This works. It just looks ungly because you can see the text getting changed. I think this together with the CSS text transform is the best solution. Thank you –  Butcher Apr 7 '11 at 0:32
    
You can't see the text being changed if you use keydown instead of keyup. –  BobRodes Sep 14 '12 at 19:27
1  
Cursor position is lost. The block in if does nothing. –  Lukasz Aug 27 '13 at 14:59
css

#textbox{text-transform:uppercase}
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@Andrew Hare ...seems to work fine: jsfiddle.net/hzhh6 –  jon3laze Apr 6 '11 at 19:06
1  
.. but then you can catch the "onchange" event and update the value to actual uppercase characters (if you access the value of the input box, it is still lowercase letters) –  naivists Apr 6 '11 at 19:06
1  
It works now - the first version had upper-case instead of uppercase. :) +1 from me as this is a clever answer but doesn't actually change the value of the textbox. –  Andrew Hare Apr 6 '11 at 19:07
    
This is an elegant solution. Server-side usually needs to handle normalizing the input anyway. I did not know CSS could do this. –  Pete May 2 '12 at 14:16
1  
I know the OP has asked how to do it with JavaScript, however I would argue this is a more elegant and efficient way to do it. Also it has to be considered much more maintainable than this sort of thing: if (e.which >= 97 && e.which <= 122) {. –  crmpicco Aug 28 '13 at 16:00

This might be a nice workaround. Just set this in your CSS:

input#textbox {
    text-transform: uppercase;
}

If you post the data to a server side script (lets say php) you can always do something like this:

$upper_data = strtoupper($_POST['textbox']);
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try this css script it's work for me.

<style>    
input{text-transform:uppercase};
</style>    

for information, what you see maybe upper case but it's actually still what you type like if you type "Test" it shown as "TEST" but when your get by val() it shown as "Test".

if you want to make it be upper case for real then add some script below on event like blur from the object or elenent as you need.

$(this).val($(this).val().toUpperCase());

And if you want to use for specific object add some extra script like what i used by now

input[attr]{
text-transform:uppercase;
}

input[attr='value']{
text-transform:uppercase;
}
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Will it work in all browsers? –  Narendra Apr 15 at 3:56
    
i have use it on chrome and mozilla. it work fine for me. may be you could help with another browser, and share it with the others. thanks –  percayahati Apr 15 at 7:08
    
it work on ie 8 too. –  percayahati Apr 15 at 7:22

Hi this code works fine on input and textarea without delay or capitalization change

$("#input").on('input', function(evt) {
              var input = $(this);
              var start = input[0].selectionStart;
              $(this).val(function (_, val) {
                return val.toUpperCase();
              });
              input[0].selectionStart = input[0].selectionEnd = start;
            });

mix from http://stackoverflow.com/a/7944108/1272540 and http://stackoverflow.com/a/13155583/1272540

jsFiddle

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I found this code working fine for me. One small change to take all inputs: using a class that apply to all inputs $(".input-large").on(...); –  Adrian P. Sep 20 '13 at 15:07
    
Unfortunately this is not working on IE. –  Adrian P. Jan 6 at 16:56
$("#id").keyup(function() {
    $(this).val($(this).val().replace(/([a-z])/,function(){
        return $("#id").toUpperCase();
    }));
});

small correction in the above script this will work perfectly now.

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Cursor position is lost - it goes to the last position. You should test your solution before posting it here. –  Lukasz Aug 27 '13 at 15:05

Since you tagged this as a jQuery question as well, here's a simple (well, fairly simple) jQuery solution:

$('#text_statute_section').on('keypress', function(event) {
    if(null !== String.fromCharCode(event.which).match(/[a-z]/g)) {
        event.preventDefault();
        $(this).val($(this).val() + String.fromCharCode(event.which).toUpperCase());
    }
});

Using keypress prevents the "bounce" effect that keyup has (keydown also does, but event.which doesn't distinguish directly between upper and lower case here--shift key check is messy owing to caps lock). Also, this operates on the input character, converts it to uppercase, and then appends it to the existing value, rather than first appending and then converting the whole thing to uppercase as most of the other solutions I've seen do. Finally, it actually converts the character rather than applying a formatting style to it as CSS does. All this gives better control, especially in situations where some characters need to be forced to uppercase and some not, such as in serial numbers or the like.

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1  
It is not always correct to append the typed character to the current value. This makes it impossible to edit text elsewhere within the string (e.g., type "WORLD", then click to put the cursor at the beginning and try to make the value say "HELLO WORLD"... you'll get "WORLDHELLO "). –  user113215 Jan 22 '13 at 19:10
    
Good point, user. I was borrowing from something I wrote where that wasn't an issue (I think), but it certainly could be. I'll run back and double check my code. Thanks! –  BobRodes Feb 4 '13 at 21:49
function changeToUpperCase(event,obj) {
    charValue = (document.all) ? event.keyCode : event.which;
    if (charValue!="8" && charValue!="0" && charValue != "27"){
        obj.value += String.fromCharCode(charValue).toUpperCase();
        return false;
    }else{
        return true;
    }
}

<input type="text" onkeypress="return changeToUpperCase(event,this)" />
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While the CSS + Server Side UCase approach is probably "best", here is a Client Side jQuery solution I use when the need arises:

$("#id").keyup(function() {
    $(this).val($(this).val().replace(/([a-z])/,function(s){return s.toUpperCase()}));
});

She's not pretty, but she'll get the job done!

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1  
it prevents editing the field, doesn't it? –  esp Feb 11 '13 at 14:13
    
No... it just Ups the case on keyup. are you seeing an issue in a specific browser @esp? –  Campbeln Feb 14 '13 at 7:09
    
Had this thing in safari when changing the form field resulted in moving the cursor to the end of the field, as it is above it won't let you move cursor with arrows inside the field. Probably if you filter carefully on which keys not to touch the field it can work. But it's strange I can't find the way just to replace the character as it's typed, before it is inserted. Didn't look very hard though ;) –  esp Feb 14 '13 at 11:29

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