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I am looking over some code that looks something like this

map<string, int>::iterator itr = mValue.find(inName);

Why are they defining an iterator. Is it not possible to say something like

int value = mValue.find(inName)

Thanks.

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and maybe upvote some answers –  Jean-Bernard Pellerin Apr 6 '11 at 19:03
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7 Answers

You can get the value by dereferencing the iterator (as if it were a pointer). This returns a key/value pair type, which has a member second that has the value:

map<string, int>::iterator itr = mValue.find(inName);
int value = itr->second;

The reason an iterator is returned is because the end() iterator is returned when a match couldn't be found:

map<string, int>::iterator itr = mValue.find(inName);
if (itr == mValue.end())
{
  throw "No value could be found.";
}

int value = itr->second;

Hopefully that makes some sense.

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+1 for clear explanation of dereferencing the iterator –  Jeff Grimes Aug 2 '13 at 23:21
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What happens if that key does not exist in the map? What would you return for find? With an iterator, you can return mValue.end(). In addition, iterators allow iteration- an int doesn't.

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mValue.find(inName) returns an iterator to the position in the map at which the key inName is located. If you just want the corresponding value, you can use mValue[inName].

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1  
This is non-const, though and will create a map entry if it's not there. (not that the original code is less disastrous in case there's no value). –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 6 '11 at 19:03
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int value = mValue.find(inName)->second;

provided find didn't return mValue.end()

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You probably want to use

map<string, int>::iterator itr = mValue.find(inName);
int value = mValue[inName];

mValue[inName] = 1234;

Take care, it will not work on a const map (because it wouldn't be able to insert the entry)

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Why are they defining an iterator.

Because that's what the map .find() function returns, an iterator containing the key and value. Or it returns mValue.end() if the value was not found, which is useful as you can test for whether the value was found in the map or not.

to get the value you can do:

map<string, int>::iterator itr = mValue.find(inName);
if(itr != map.end()) {
  int value = itr->second;
  // use value
}

Is it not possible to say something like int value = mValue.find(inName)

No, std::map does not have a function like that. (and if it did, it'd have to throw an exception in the case the value was not found)

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It does have a function like that (operator[]), but it has the additional side effect of inserting the key in the map if it doesn't already exist (which gets around having to throw an exception). –  dfan Apr 6 '11 at 19:56
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Original:

Because find returns the position of the pair in the map where the key is found. In case it is not found, it returns NULL and hence the check

Edit: updating the answer, but not deleting the original content to let others know what was wrong and why this answer was downvoted.

Update Answer:

Because find returns the position of the pair in the map where the key is found. In case it is not found, it returns map.end().

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It doesn't retun NULL when not found. So -1 for a wrong answer. –  Sjoerd Apr 6 '11 at 19:05
    
Seconded for not removing the answer after the initial downvote. –  phooji Apr 6 '11 at 19:44
    
@phooji: Its not possible for everybody to be online all the time. If you feel you want to downvote just because the person did not remove the answer you are free to do so. –  hype Apr 7 '11 at 9:11
    
@Sjoerd: I think i missed this part...i've used the expression iter == map.end() a number of times. Anyways, thanks for pointing that out. –  hype Apr 7 '11 at 9:16
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