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I have a base class and a few derivative. I have to 'register' some static function from each of them. Here is the example:

class Base
{
   // Some interface...
};

class Der1 : Base
{
   static void Do();
};
class Der2 : Base
{
   static void Do();
};

void processStatic()
{
   SomeFunc(Der1::Do);
   SomeFunc(Der2::Do);
}

As you see, SomeFunc receives function pointer. I want to do that automatically with each new derivative class, is it possible? Maybe, predefine static function in Base class and register it there. But I think it's impossible, yes?


Maybe, this will be more easier to understand what do I want:

class Der1 : Base
{
   Der1() { SomeFunc(Der1::Do); }
   static void Do();
};
class Der2 : Base
{
   Der2() { SomeFunc(Der2::Do); }
   static void Do();
};
share|improve this question
    
What does SomeFunc do? Do you want it to be called every construction, like your second example, or only once, like presumed in your first example? Does it matter when? Does order matter? –  GManNickG Apr 6 '11 at 20:05
    
Do you want to call the registration function once per class, or once per object? The first example implies the former; the second example implies the latter. –  Robᵩ Apr 6 '11 at 20:06
    
@rob-adams once per class. @gman that function put function pointer into some list which I use later. –  Ockonal Apr 6 '11 at 20:07
    
So what does the base class have to do with it? –  GManNickG Apr 6 '11 at 20:19
    
@gman The main idea is that each Derivative class will add it's static method into some map of function pointers. –  Ockonal Apr 6 '11 at 20:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: Completely replacing previous answer due to clarified requirements.

You could use the CRTP to declare a specialized base class that does nothing more than call your registration function:

#include <iostream>
void SomeFunc(void(*fp)()) {
  (*fp)();
};

template <class D>
struct ExtraBass {
  ExtraBass() {
    static bool once;
    if(!once)
      SomeFunc(D::Do);
    once = true;
  }
};

struct Bass {
};

struct Drive : Bass, ExtraBass<Drive>  {
  static  void Do() { std::cout << "Drive::Do\n"; }
};

struct Deride : Bass , ExtraBass<Deride> {
  static  void Do() { std::cout << "Deride::Do\n"; }
};

int main() {
  Drive d1;
  Deride d2;
  Deride d3;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Bass -> Base. :) Though extra bass can be sweet. –  GManNickG Apr 6 '11 at 20:24

This is not an easy thing to do in C++, but I'm not saying it's impossible. If all you need is a list of subclass names, these answers might help:

[C/C++] somehow register my classes in a list

c++ List of classes without initializing them for use of static functions

Seems either macro magic or boost mpl is your tool of choice.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I agree, it sounds impossible without some "macro magic" –  briantyler Apr 6 '11 at 20:05

I just wondering, if you did something like

void SomeFunc(void (*doFunc)())
{ 
   doFunc();
}

template <class T> int Register()
{
    SomeFunc(T::Do);
    return 0;
}

template <class T> class Base
{
   static int _i;
};

template <class T> int Base<T>::_i =  Register<T>();

class Derived : Base<Derived>
{
   public:
   static void Do() {  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
template <class T> int Base<T>::_i = Register<T>(); That is not automatic registering I was talking about. –  Ockonal Apr 6 '11 at 20:50

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