Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am curious as to the best practices/most efficient way to structure my data.

options

  1. All scripts go in scripts folder, all stylesheets go in css folder.
    concerns with this method is that plugins that are dependent on a stylesheet would not be in the same directory and could be overlooked when adding the script to a page

  2. Dynamically add styles to plugin script via jQuery negating the need for the external stylesheet.
    concerts with this method is the overhead loading styles via jQuery vs. stylesheet

  3. Separate scripts, stylesheets, and plugins into separate folders and have the plugins script dynamically load the stylesheet.
    concerns with this method is that it's possibly equal to, or greater than the overhead of the previous method

I'm unsure of the overhead on options 2 & 3, they would be the cleanest/preferred methods however.

I plan on documenting the process on using the custom plugins, however I want to prevent over-site and future confusion but need to maintain low overhead.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

options

1 - All scripts go in scripts folder, all stylesheets go in css folder....

Correct. Normalize all paths to suit this structure.

2 - Dynamically add styles to plugin script via jQuery negating the need for the external stylesheet. concerts with this method is the overhead loading styles via jQuery vs. stylesheet

Browser have a cache for a reason. This breaks the ability to cache.

3 - Separate scripts, stylesheets, and plugins into separate folders and have the plugins script dynamically load the stylesheet. concerns with this method is that it's possibly equal to, or greater than the overhead of the previous method

Don't load stylesheets dynamically. See #2.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly, stick to standards and conventions. Allow the browser vendors to figure out ways to cache and load your resources. –  John Strickler Apr 6 '11 at 20:38
    
Thanks, I agree. I think my confusion is on the custom plugins that I build...When creating controls in a plugin should I style them there too or use an external stylesheet? –  jon3laze Apr 6 '11 at 20:40
    
Writing your own plugins shouldn't stop you from using an external stylesheet. For example, jQuery UI uses an external one. –  Richard Neil Ilagan Apr 6 '11 at 20:50
    
Thanks, I think I was trying to over complicate this. –  jon3laze Apr 7 '11 at 3:00

Personally I use this type of folder structure, because it clearly defines the code I must manage versus the code I use but do not manage.

Content
   scripts
     //scripts you created
   css
     //css you create
   images
     // images you created
   frameworks
     jQuery
     jQueryUI
     Other Plugins
share|improve this answer
    
So on custom plugins you write yourself that require css, where do you place the css and how do you load them as to ensure inclusion? –  jon3laze Apr 6 '11 at 20:35
    
on my own custom plugins I include as I would each normal script or css. Scrips in the scripts folder, css in the css folder. In essense I use a master template in Visual Studio to include the necessary scripts and css for each page. Its not automatic you do have to remember to enter the reference in at least one page to both the css and the scripts. Also to note I generally do not load css files dynamically through javascript. –  John Hartsock Apr 6 '11 at 20:40
    
Thank you for the feedback. I will look into loading in a Master Template. –  jon3laze Apr 7 '11 at 3:01

I recently wrote a post detailing my folder setup, which is based on a siloed structure of 4 top-level folders:

/assets
/content
/resources
/vendor

The reason for this is separation of concerns, based on 3 main criteria:

  • what is the content type?
  • who is responsible for the content?
  • how often the content will be updated?

The core tenet is separating 3rd-party code from project code through /vendor and /assets.

Any code that should be layered between (e.g. themes, enhancements, monkey-patches) should go in /assets/vendor.

Therefore your customisation hierarchy is:

  • /vendor
  • /assets/vendor
  • /assets/[resource type]

It won't solve your questions about the way to load assets, but it will provide structure on how you manage your assets.

More info and examples here: http://www.davestewart.co.uk/blog/project-structuring/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.