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Found this code in one of our classes but I am not understanding what the first case statement is doing: "Case i = 1". I am sure that someone just incorrectly converted this from an IF/ELSE statement but why is VB.NET allowing this syntax. What does it mean when it is written this way?

    Dim i As Integer = 1
    Select Case i
        Case i = 1
            Return True
        Case Else
            Return False
    End Select
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That is rather bizarre. Replace it with "return true" I guess. –  asawyer Apr 6 '11 at 20:56
    
asawyer, of course this isn't the real code. This is my simplified version of the jist of the code. Not really looking how to rewrite it. Looking to understand what it means when it is written this way. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:00
2  
Put Option Strict On at the top of the file to catch mistakes like these. Now you get a nice compiler error on that code. –  Hans Passant Apr 6 '11 at 21:14
1  
FYI, Option Strict doesn't think this is a compilation error. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:27
1  
@Denis it should. Option Strict On disallows implicit conversions from Boolean to Integer which will case the Case i = 1 to be illegal. I've verified this in VS2010 –  JaredPar Apr 6 '11 at 21:36
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In short the code is effectively doing the following

If i = (i = 1) Then
  Return True
Else
  Return False
End If

The Case expression in a VB.Net Select .. Case statement comes in 3 different forms.

  1. Case expr1 To expr2
  2. Case Is comparisonOp expr
  3. Case expr

This example is the 3rd version of the Case operator. Implicitly the compiler will evaluate the expression testExpr = expr for that Case statement. In this case (haha) it comes out to i = (i = 1)

Note: When run the conditional will actually evaluate to false and hence the else block will be run. The reason why is the expression is actually evaluated as

i = CInt(i = 1)

The i = 1 portion will evaluate to True and due to legacy reasons from VB6 (and COM's version of TRUE) the CInt(True) portion will evaluate to -1 and hence the comparison will fail.

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Yup, it seems that this behavior is the same but how did you arrive at this? How did you arrive at (i = True)? –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:08
    
@Denis updated it with a bit more detail –  JaredPar Apr 6 '11 at 21:10
    
Thank you. I appreciate it. You have a great explanation. Wish I could mark both as answers. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:26
    
@Denis glad I could help. Truth be told I had to look this one up and I used to work on the VB.Net Compiler. Tricky part of the language. –  JaredPar Apr 6 '11 at 21:29
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The Case statement can take any expression that is implicitly convertible to the type of the value in the Select statement.

The expression i = 1 will be evaluated to either True or False, which is then converted to an integer value and compared to i.

The integer value of True is -1, so i = 1 will never be equal to i. The case will never be used, regardless of the value of i.

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i = 1 will be true but CInt(True) = -1. If I change the declaration of i to "Dim i as Integer = -1" then according to your explanation it should return True. It doesn't. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:13
    
OK, looking at the revised explanation. So I follow you up to "The integer value of True is -1" but I lost you on "so i = 1 will never be equal to i". Why is that? –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:16
1  
@Denis: If i is -1, then the expression i = 1 is False, which is converted to 0, so it's not equal to i. There is no value for i where it will be equal to i = 1. –  Guffa Apr 6 '11 at 21:18
    
Thank you, I gave it some thought and it definitely makes sense. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:21
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Use Option Strict and you will see compilation errors.
The code posted above does implicit conversion from integer to boolean & the result will be False.

EDIT: Your code will become
if 1 = (i = 1) then
to
if 1 = (true) then

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No compilation errors using Option Strict On. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:23
    
Just to add to the above: –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:33
    
Just to add to the above: 1 = CInt(True) which yields 1 = -1 which is false so the case will be skipped. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:45
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shrug Ours is not to reason why, ours is just to simplify.

Return True
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Andy, of course this isn't the real code. This is my simplified version of the jist of the code. Not really looking how to rewrite it. Looking to understand what it means when it is written this way. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:01
    
actually the code returns False not True –  JaredPar Apr 6 '11 at 21:11
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I think = is an overload operator in vb

it's further discussed here: vb = operator

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What do you mean? This is a straight comparison test, does i equal 1 or not. –  asawyer Apr 6 '11 at 21:00
1  
You would think that it actually returns True but it DOESN'T. Run it. –  Denis Apr 6 '11 at 21:05
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It may be a bug. It should be,

Dim i As Integer = 1
 Select Case True
     Case i = 1
         Return True
     Case Else
         Return False
 End Select 
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