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I have a fixed header. As I scroll, certain elements cover the header. How do I control this?

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closed as not a real question by Andrew Barber May 17 '13 at 19:28

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Bonus points for using placekitten. –  Matt Ball Apr 6 '11 at 21:08
    
@Matt Totally man, it's either that or charlie sheen placeholders ;) –  Jake Apr 6 '11 at 21:11
    
Oh man, I didn't even think of that! mind=blown –  Matt Ball Apr 6 '11 at 21:12
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@Matt I spend too much time not doing work, here's another one - lorizzle (gangster lorem ipsum). –  Jake Apr 6 '11 at 21:16
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should set the z-index for the divs:

#headercontainer {
    z-index:1;
}
#contentcontainer {
    z-index:-1;
}

Adding the above lines should give your header priority over the content container.

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As per my answer, only one of them needs the z-index set. –  Matt Ball Apr 6 '11 at 21:10
    
Very true, I just have a habbit of setting something I know I want to stay at the very bottom a z-index of -1 :) –  Bendihossan Apr 6 '11 at 21:11
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There are two solutions I can think of quickly off the top of my head. You can either give the #headercontainer element a z-index CSS property...

#headercontainer {
    /* ... other CSS ... */
    z-index: 1000;
}

... or you can do it the way I think it should be done...

#headercontainer {
    /* ... other CSS ... */
    position: fixed;
    top: 0px;
}

#contentcontainer {
    /* ... other CSS ... */
    margin-top: 125px; /* this should be at least the height of the header */
}

In the second solution, you don't have to worry about which element is hovering over which other element. The #contentcontainer element is properly pushed down under the #headercontainer element so that they have no overlap.

I hope this helps.
Hristo

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+1, this is definitely the better solution. I'd initially tried this, but I was missing header {top: 0} so it didn't actually work. –  Matt Ball Apr 6 '11 at 21:19
    
Thanks for the options and your opinion mate, I'm not really familiar with z-index so I'd probably go for the second option too –  Jake Apr 6 '11 at 21:20
    
Glad I could help! –  Hristo Apr 6 '11 at 21:28
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@Jake... by the way, Stack Overflow tradition shows that the most helpful answer is usually marked as "Accepted". So whichever of these (currently) 3 answers is most helpful, you should accept. –  Hristo Apr 6 '11 at 21:38
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That is because you're using the position: fixed property. That will keep the header at the top of the page always, no matter what, even when you scroll. –  Hristo Apr 6 '11 at 21:46
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Give the #headercontainer a higher z-index:

#headercontainer {
    z-index: 10;
}
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Thank you! I've never come across this before –  Jake Apr 6 '11 at 21:08
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