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Say I have the following sort of app:

Shoes.app do
    @i = 0

    def add_button
        button ("#{@i += 1}")
    end

    button("0") {add_button}
end

So that each time you click the button it adds a new button with a higher number. Is there any way to code it so that clicking one of the new buttons displays its number? Since self always points to the app, the obvious approach

button ("#{@i += 1}") {alert @i}

Doesn't work, since then clicking any button just displays the current value of @i.

share|improve this question
    
Does button method return an instance of a button? If so, then you can assign the integer to the button as an instance variable when its created. –  sawa Apr 6 '11 at 21:10
    
That could potentially work, but the obvious way of attempting to do so would create an instance variable for the app, not the button. –  Max Apr 6 '11 at 22:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
Shoes.app do
    @i = 0

    def add_button
        n = @i+1
        button ("#{@i += 1}") {alert n}
    end

    button("0") {add_button}
end
share|improve this answer
    
That is very strange. But it works! Seems hacky, though. –  Max Apr 6 '11 at 22:12
    
The reason it works is that n is a local variable, and blocks in Ruby are closures. Each invocation of the add_button method creates a new local n variable, but that variable does not go away after the method is done because the block passed to button closed over it and retained its reference. –  Phrogz Apr 6 '11 at 22:20

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