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How does JQuery handle the "Cannot set property xxx of undefined" issue?" If I have:

function Foo() {
   Foo.fn = Foo.prototype;
}

Then I have an extension JavaScript file with this code:

(function(foo) {
   foo.fn.myPlugin = function() {
       //return something here
   };
})(Foo);

I get an error that says "Cannot set property myPlugin of undefined." Funny enough if I just copy the plugin code into FireBug or Chrome and execute it in the console, it works fine and attaches and works as expected like:

foo.myPlugin();

I'm guessing my problem either comes from the timing of the browser loading the document, or the fact that my existing object isn't inside of it's own namespace. I'm wondering if this only works when you define a class using the var syntax??

I don't know...from what I understand...either should work.

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If you're asking why your code doesn't work, you might want to change the title. jQuery doesn't have a "Cannot set property xxx of undefined" issue, at least not as far as I know. –  jdigital Apr 6 '11 at 21:44
    
I'm actually asking how jQuery works...maybe my title is confusing I'll see if I can change it. –  farina Apr 7 '11 at 20:31
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
function Baz() {
   return this;
}
Baz.prototype.fn = Baz.prototype;
var Foo = new Baz();
Baz = null;
(function(Bar) {
   Bar.fn.myPlugin = function() {
       return "test";
   };
})(Foo);
Foo.myPlugin(); //returns test

This works, and leaves Baz assignable. Not sure if that is how jQuery does it or not.

share|improve this answer
    
jQuery puts has something liek Baz.fn = Baz.prototype; inside of the Baz class. Then, after it's instantiated you can do Baz.fn.whatever = function() etc... –  farina Apr 7 '11 at 21:25
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This isn't an issue for jQuery. There's at least one problem in your code, as pointed out in another answer.

If you are serious about understanding this, John Resig (the original author of jQuery) has put together an excellent interactive tutorial called Learning Advanced Javascript.

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From what I can tell, you never execute the line:

Foo.fn = Foo.prototype;

in your Foo() function.

Functions only execute when you call them.

Try using the singleton pattern:

var Foo = new function Foo() {
    this.fn = this.prototype;
};

In this case, you're creating an instance of the Foo object by calling the new operator on the named anonymous Foo() function.

share|improve this answer
    
What if the object takes constructor arguments like: var Foo = new function Foo(a,b,c) {this.fn = this.prototype;this.doSomething = function() {alert(a);};}; –  farina Apr 7 '11 at 20:41
    
How are the argument values attained? Are they available on page load? –  typeof Apr 7 '11 at 21:32
    
In the existing model, they are passed in on instantiation of the object. Like var Bar = new Foo(a,b,c); –  farina Apr 8 '11 at 21:40
    
That should work. –  typeof Apr 9 '11 at 0:04
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