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(iPhone) Pulling my hair out just trying to declare and set a stupid variable. Here's the code:

const GLfloat zNear = 0.01, zFar = 1000.0, fieldOfView = 60.0; 
GLfloat size;
size = zNear * tanf(DEGREES_TO_RADIANS*fieldOfView / 2.0));

Gives me the error "Conflicting types for 'size'".

If I write it like this instead:

const GLfloat zNear = 0.01, zFar = 1000.0, fieldOfView = 60.0; 
GLfloat size = zNear * tanf(DEGREES_TO_RADIANS*fieldOfView / 2.0));

I get the error, "Initializer element is not constant".

What's really weird is that this code worked fine when it was inside a method. I moved it out of the method, and now it fails. What's going on here?

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Are you supposed to have the double )) at the end of your statement? –  Tony Million Apr 6 '11 at 21:34
    
size is a common variable name, so there might be a size instance variable or something else within your current scope with that name (which I've seen to cause the "conflicting types" errors in the past). Try renaming it calculatedSize or something else and see if that removes the error. –  Brad Larson Apr 7 '11 at 14:09
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When dealing at global-scope, statements can be assigned to only constant literals.

// At global scope
int a = 10 ; // fine
int b = a ;  // Not allowed
b = a ;      // Not allowed
b = 100 ;    // fine

const int aa = 10 ;  // fine
const int bb ;
bb = aa ;   // Not allowed

The solution is #define. Try this -

#define zNear 0.01
#define zFar 1000.0
#define fieldOfView 60.0

GLfloat size;
size = zNear * tanf(DEGREES_TO_RADIANS*fieldOfView / 2.0));
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I guess that you can use something like

#define kPosun 44.0 
before implementation statement.

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