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I'm writing a shell script that I want to add an alias to the end of the alias list in the .bashrc file. I'm thinking something with sed would work, just not sure how to find the last line that begins with alias, then add on the next line another alias.

Thanks for an

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please give an example input and desired output. –  SiegeX Apr 6 '11 at 22:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Why do you need to add it to an "alias list"? If you don't have additional requirements that you did not specify in the question, just append your alias to .bashrc:

echo "alias youralias='yourcmd'" >> /home/user/.bashrc
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Often, .bashrc loads .alias - making it even more obvious, but the end of .bashrc works, too. –  Tanktalus Apr 7 '11 at 1:51

When I hear "do something after the last whatever", I think of reversing the file and do something when I see the first whatever:

tac .bashrc | 
awk -v newalias="alias new=foo" '$1 == "alias" {print newalias} 1' | 
tac > .bashrc.new
mv .bashrc .bashrc.$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S) && mv .bashrc.new .bashrc
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IMHO this is much easier/cleaner to do in Perl, Python, etc.

But if you must use sed, here's a starting point:

$ sed -ne ':START
/alias/b ALIASES
p
b
:ALIASES
p
n
/alias/b ALIASES
i \
alias foo=bar
:REST
p
n
b REST
' < aliases > aliases.new
$ diff -u aliases aliases.new
--- aliases     2011-04-07 08:30:30.000000000 +1000
+++ aliases.new 2011-04-07 08:34:09.000000000 +1000
@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@

 alias a=apple
 alias b=banana
+alias foo=bar

 echo something else
$ mv aliases.new aliases

A fuller version that works for me is

$ name=b
$ replacement=barney
sed -i.bak -n -e '
:START
/^[[:space:]]*alias/ b NEXTALIAS
# not an alias, print it as-is and go to next line
p
b
:NEXTALIAS
# start processing this alias line
/^[[:space:]]*alias[[:space:]][[:space:]]*'"$name"'/ b REPLACE
/^[[:space:]]*alias/ b PRINT

# found the end of the alias block, insert the alias here
:INSERT
# grab the indentation back from the hold space
x
s/$/alias '"$name='$replacement'"'/
p
x
b REST

:PRINT
# remember how the last alias line was indented...
h
s/^\([[:space:]]*\).*/\1/
x
# ... and print the line
p
n
b NEXTALIAS

:REPLACE
# we found an existing alias with a matching name, replace it
# I add single quotes around replacement so that the caller can write
# replacement='echo something' rather than replacement="'echo something'"
s/\(.*\)alias[[:space:]][[:space:]]*'"$name"'.*/\1alias '"$name='$replacement'"/'
b REST

:REST
# we made it past the aliases block, just print the remaining lines
p
n
b REST
' aliases

$ diff -u aliases.bak aliases
--- aliases.bak 2011-04-07 09:09:26.000000000 +1000
+++ aliases     2011-04-07 09:11:05.000000000 +1000
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 echo blah

 alias a=apple
-alias b=banana
+alias b='barney'
 alias c=carrot

 echo something else

Note that there are some edge cases I have not handled explicitly. For example, what should happen if there are two blocks of aliases? What if there is a commented out alias in the middle of the alias block, etc.

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awk is the tool to use if you can't use better scripting language. There's no need to use sed`

awk 'FNR==NR&&/alias/{s=FNR;next}FNR==s{ $0=$0"\nalias=new alias\n"}NR>FNR' .bashrc .bashrc > temp && mv temp .bashrc
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