Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to figure out if there is a way to do this in Rails more efficiently.

There is kind of a long setup for the question, so please bear with me. Let's say I have models Customer, Phone, Address

Here are sample migrations to give you an idea:

class CreatePhones < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :phones do |t|
      t.integer     :country_prefix, :limit => 3
      t.integer     :area_prefix,    :limit => 5
      t.integer     :number,         :limit => 7
      t.integer :category_id
      t.references  :phonable, :polymorphic => true
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

class CreateAddress < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :addresses do |t|
      t.string  :address_line_1
      t.string  :address_line_2
      t.string  :address_line_3
      t.string  :city
      t.string  :state
      t.string  :zip
      t.string  :country
      t.string  :attn
      t.integer :category_id
      t.references  :addressable, :polymorphic => true
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end
class CreateCategories < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :categories do |t|
          t.string  :name
          t.string  :code         
          t.integer :category_id  # Every subcategory has a category: i.e. phone has work, fax,mobile

          t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

class CreateCustomers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :customers do |t|
      t.string      :code                            , :limit => 20                         , :null => false 
      t.string      :name                                                                   , :null => false  
      t.string      :billing_name                    
      t.integer     :preferred_shipping_method_id      
end
end

Here are models and relations:

class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :preferred_shipping_method , :class_name => "Category", :foreign_key => :preferred_shipping_method_id

  has_many :addresses,  :as => :addressable,  :include => :category, :dependent => :destroy
  has_many :phones,     :as => :phonable,     :include => :category, :dependent => :destroy
end

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :addresses
  has_many :phones
  has_many :customer_by_shipping_methods, :class_name => "Customer", :foreign_key => :preferred_shipping_method_id
  has_many :subcategories, :class_name  => "Category", :foreign_key => :category_id
  belongs_to :category, :class_name => "Category"
end

class Address < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :category
  belongs_to :addressable, :polymorphic => true

end

class Phone < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :category
  belongs_to :phonable, :polymorphic => true
end

Here is a question.

Let's say I have a customer record with a bunch of phone (mobile, work) and addresses (billing, shipping).

old = Customer.where(:code => "ABC").first

Then I'm creating or importing (from a legacy DB) another customer object

new = Customer.new
new.code = "ABC"
new.phones.build(:number => "12345567") 

etc.

Then I want to compare old customer info to the new customer info and based on that update old customer info.

Like so :

if old.eql?(new) # this should compare not only, name & code and such but also polymorphic associations

  old.update_with(new) # this should update old info attributes with new if there is new info, or if update / add to one of the associations
  old.save # 
else
  new.save
end

So the question is is there any CONVENTIONAL way in Rails 3 to do what I describe in comments?

Right now I'm overriding hash & eql? methods which is fine for comparison. But to update each attribute and each associated object and its attributes, is getting kind of involved. I was wondering if there is an easier way to do this then my way:

class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base

  def hash
    %{#{ name }#{ code }}.hash # There is a lot more here of course
  end

  def eql?(other)
    hash == other.hash
  end

def update_with(other)
  name = other.name
  code = other.code
  etc ....
end    



end
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok it doesn't look like there is a standard solution so here is something I came up if anybody else is looking for it.

You can rename methods anyway you like, just put this in you lib folder in some .rb file. ( don't forget to mention it in environment.rb like so require 'custom_comparisons'

/lib/custom_comparisons.rb

module ActiveRecord
  class Base

    def comparison_hash
      h = ""
      self.attributes.each_pair do |key, value|
        unless ["id", "updated_at", "created_at"].include?(key)
          h << "#{value}"
        end  
      end  
      h.hash
    end 

    def eql_to?(other)
      comparison_hash == other.comparison_hash
    end

    def differences_from?(other)        
      h = {}
      self.attributes.each_pair do |key, value|
        unless self.method_missing(key) == other.method_missing(key)
          h[key.to_sym] = [self.method_missing(key), other.method_missing(key)]
        end  
      end    
      h
    end    

  end
end

This can be cleaned up a bit and I need to add association drill down but the solution is there.

This does the comparison and the shows the differences between objects. Now I can update attributes that need to be updated. Will add update method and drill down tomorrow.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.