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Basically, the reverse of abs. If I have:

if($this.find('.pdxslide-activeSlide').index() < slideNum-1){ slideNum = -slideNum }
console.log(slideNum)

No matter what console ALWAYS returns a positive number. How do I fix this?

If I do:

if($this.find('.pdxslide-activeSlide').index() < slideNum-1){
_selector.animate({left:(-slideNum*sizes.images.width)+'px'},750,'InOutPDX')
}
else{
_selector.animate({left:(slideNum*sizes.images.width)+'px'},750,'InOutPDX')
}

it works tho, but it's not "DRY" and just stupid to have entire block of code JUST for for a -

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2  
I'm sure there's a jQuery plugin for that. – Jakub Hampl Apr 6 '11 at 23:26
up vote 57 down vote accepted
Math.abs(num) => Always positive
-Math.abs(num) => Always negative

You do realize however, that for your code

if($this.find('.pdxslide-activeSlide').index() < slideNum-1){ slideNum = -slideNum }
console.log(slideNum)

If the index found is 3 and slideNum is 3,
then 3 < 3-1 => false
so slideNum remains positive??

It looks more like a logic error to me.

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The reverse of abs is Math.abs(num) * -1.

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Shorter: return -Math.abs(num); – sarunast Jun 12 '15 at 12:59

The basic formula to reverse positive to negative or negative to positive:

i - (i * 2)
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13  
What's wrong with i * -1? Also, I'm not sure this answers the actual question. – Andrew Barber Sep 28 '12 at 6:56
4  
It's architecturally dependant, but 0 - i might be faster – Ben Taliadoros Oct 23 '14 at 15:10

Are you sure that control is going into the body of the if? As in does the condition in the if ever hold true? Because if it doesn't, the body of the if will never get executed and slideNum will remain positive. I'm going to hazard a guess that this is probably what you're seeing.

If I try the following in Firebug, it seems to work:

>>> i = 5; console.log(i); i = -i; console.log(i);
5
-5

slideNum *= -1 should also work. As should Math.abs(slideNum) * -1.

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I just did if($this.find('.pdxslide-activeSlide').index() < slideNum-1){ slideNum *= -1 } and im still returning positive in that console.log? – Oscar Godson Apr 6 '11 at 23:27
    
@Oscar, what Vivin is saying is that $this.find('.pdxslide-activeSlide').index() < slideNum-1 is always false. – Box9 Apr 6 '11 at 23:31

To get a negative version of a number in JavaScript you can always you the ~ bitwise operator.

For example, if you have a = 1000 and you need to convert it to a negative you could do the following:

a = ~a + 1;

which would result in a being -1000.

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Is this faster than multiplying by negative 1? – RyanDawkins Jun 2 '15 at 15:32
    
I am not sure to be honest, something you'd have to look into. – Benjamin Williams Jun 4 '15 at 12:31
    
@RyanDawkins this will not be faster than multiplying by -1. Javascript does not have boolean operators natively the way C does. So, to do a boolean operation, JS has to convert between types under the hood. – spinlock Jan 25 at 18:55

If you don't feel like using Math.Abs * -1 you can you this simple if statement :P

if (x > 0) {
    x = -x;
}

Of course you could make this a function like this

function makeNegative(number) {
    if (number > 0) {
        number = -number;
    }
}

makeNegative(-3) => -3 makeNegative(5) => -5

Hope this helps! Math.abs will likely work for you but if it doesn't this little

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Before answering a question you should also consider when it was asked. This question is almost 5 years old. So unless technology has changed and there is now a better / more appropriate answer there is usually not much value added by offering another answer. – Igor Mar 18 at 14:29

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