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I am using the Apache FTP server in a web application in Java. A legacy Windows based device is using ASCII mode to push video files to this FTP server. I want to know if its possible to: force a NON-conversion of CR LF to LF for all transferred ASCII data?

I found out that the Apache FTP server is enforcing the CR LF to LF conversion. So I need to find a way to not do the CR LF to LF conversion while using the Apache FTP server while using ASCII mode. Not sure if there is any way to do this short of building the source and trying to make a change.

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Can you not just do the conversion after the transfer is complete with dos2unix? –  CoolBeans Apr 6 '11 at 23:57
    
It looks like mod_ftp just supports standard ascii vs image handling -- are you sure your client isn't issuing a bin or image command? –  sarnold Apr 7 '11 at 0:01
    
@CoolBeans That won't really work. When I access the ASCII video file post transfer all the "0D" bytes are converted to "0A" and "0D 0A" are converted to "0A". –  wrykyn Apr 11 '11 at 21:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Found 2 ways around the problem:

  1. Running Wine on Suse and running a Windows FTP server on it. Since I will need the FTP server to run on port 21 (less than 1024) some Wine configuration is needed.

  2. Also, a change made to the Apache FTP server src to force binary transfer works as well.

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Good deal. You should mark this as accepted answer after 3 days! –  CoolBeans Apr 11 '11 at 21:29

A legacy Windows based device is using ASCII mode to push video files to this FTP server.

I must say that seems highly unlikely.

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