Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to do trace logging in a program by weaving in proxies in the IL. What are some current frameworks that are good for this?

(Most of the ones I've Googled are either old or don't have documentation, that is why I ask.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The most common thing I've come across for doing this type of thing in .Net is PostSharp. It has been around for a while and is well-known. It has a specific example for how to inject logging on its website.

share|improve this answer
    
PostSharp is a great tool. –  Samuel Neff Apr 7 '11 at 0:13
    
+1 for postSharp! –  Adam Rackis Apr 7 '11 at 0:53
    
As there seems to be quite a bit of enthusiasm for this particular tool, maybe I'll drop $35 on it and try it out. –  leeand00 Apr 7 '11 at 12:13
2  
Oh wow, it is not $35. :( –  leeand00 Apr 13 '11 at 20:10

You've got it! Checkout the NKalore project @ http://aspectsharpcomp.sourceforge.net/

It has an AOP grammar which mirrors AspectJ (pointcut, aspect, thisJoinPoint, before, etc). On the flip side there is no VS.NET support although it has a command line compiler.

share|improve this answer

CciSharp, although it's not as mature as postsharp.

If you are open to a dynamic proxy instead of code weaving then both LinFu and Castle have implementations, but I'm guessing since you asked about weavers specifically you knew that.

share|improve this answer

Spring.Net framework also has an AOP stack: http://www.springframework.net/doc-latest/reference/html/aop-quickstart.html

share|improve this answer

Postsharp I think is the more mature solution, not open source, although

share|improve this answer
    
Older versions of PostSharp were open source. The source of version 1.5.x can still be downloaded from the PostSharp website. –  LukeH Apr 7 '11 at 1:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.