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I am parsing an XML file using Nokogiri and Ruby 1.9.2. Everything seems to be working fine until I read the Descriptions (below). The text is being truncated. The input text is:

<Value>The Copthorne Aberdeen enjoys a location proximate to several bars, restaurants and other diversions. This Aberdeen hotel is located on the city’s West End, roughly a mile from the many opportunities to engage in sightseeing or simply shopping the day away. The Aberdeen International Airport is approximately 10 miles from the Copthorne Hotel in Aberdeen.

There are 89 rooms in total at the Copthorne Aberdeen Hotel. Each of the is provided with direct-dial telephone service, trouser presses, coffee and tea makers and a private bath with a bathrobe and toiletries courtesy of the hotel. The rooms are light in color.

The Hotel Copthorne Aberdeen offers its guests a restaurant where they can enjoy their meals in a somewhat formal setting. For something more laid-back, guests may have a drink and a light meal in the hotel bar. This hotel does offer business services and there are rooms for meetings located onsite. The hotel also provides a secure parking facility for those who arrive by private car.</Value>

But instead I am getting:

g. For something more laid-back, guests may have a drink and a light meal in the hotel bar. This hotel does offer business services and there are rooms for meetings located onsite. The hotel also provides a secure parking facility for those who arrive by private car.

Notice it starts at g. which is leaving off more than half.

Here is the complete XML file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Hotel>
  <HotelID>1040900</HotelID>
  <HotelFileName>Copthorne_Hotel_Aberdeen</HotelFileName>
  <HotelName>Copthorne Hotel Aberdeen</HotelName>
  <CityID>10</CityID>
  <CityFileName>Aberdeen</CityFileName>
  <CityName>Aberdeen</CityName>
  <CountryCode>GB</CountryCode>
  <CountryFileName>United_Kingdom</CountryFileName>
  <CountryName>United Kingdom</CountryName>
  <StarRating>4</StarRating>
  <Latitude>57.146068572998</Latitude>
  <Longitude>-2.111680030823</Longitude>
  <Popularity>1</Popularity>
  <Address>122 Huntly Street</Address>
  <CurrencyCode>GBP</CurrencyCode>
  <LowRate>36.8354</LowRate>
  <Facilities>1|2|3|5|6|8|10|11|15|17|18|19|20|22|27|29|30|34|36|39|40|41|43|45|47|49|51|53|55|56|60|62|140|154|209</Facilities>
  <NumberOfReviews>239</NumberOfReviews>
  <OverallRating>3.95</OverallRating>
  <CleanlinessRating>3.98</CleanlinessRating>
  <ServiceRating>3.98</ServiceRating>
  <FacilitiesRating>3.83</FacilitiesRating>
  <LocationRating>4.06</LocationRating>
  <DiningRating>3.93</DiningRating>
  <RoomsRating>3.68</RoomsRating>
  <PropertyType>0</PropertyType>
  <ChainID>92</ChainID>
  <Checkin>14</Checkin>
  <Checkout>12</Checkout>
  <Images>
    <Image>19305754</Image>
    <Image>19305755</Image>
    <Image>19305756</Image>
    <Image>19305757</Image>
    <Image>19305758</Image>
    <Image>19305759</Image>
    <Image>19305760</Image>
    <Image>19305761</Image>
    <Image>19305762</Image>
    <Image>19305763</Image>
    <Image>19305764</Image>
    <Image>19305765</Image>
    <Image>19305766</Image>
    <Image>19305767</Image>
    <Image>37102984</Image>
  </Images>
  <Descriptions>
    <Description>
      <Name>General Description</Name>
      <Value>The Copthorne Aberdeen enjoys a location proximate to several bars, restaurants and other diversions. This Aberdeen hotel is located on the city’s West End, roughly a mile from the many opportunities to engage in sightseeing or simply shopping the day away. The Aberdeen International Airport is approximately 10 miles from the Copthorne Hotel in Aberdeen.

There are 89 rooms in total at the Copthorne Aberdeen Hotel. Each of the is provided with direct-dial telephone service, trouser presses, coffee and tea makers and a private bath with a bathrobe and toiletries courtesy of the hotel. The rooms are light in color.

The Hotel Copthorne Aberdeen offers its guests a restaurant where they can enjoy their meals in a somewhat formal setting. For something more laid-back, guests may have a drink and a light meal in the hotel bar. This hotel does offer business services and there are rooms for meetings located onsite. The hotel also provides a secure parking facility for those who arrive by private car.</Value>
    </Description>
    <Description>
      <Name>LocationDescription</Name>
      <Value>Aberdeen's premier four star hotel located in the city centre just off Union Street and the main business and entertainment areas. Within 10 minutes journey of Aberdeen Railway Station and only 10-20 minutes journey from International Airport.</Value>
    </Description>
  </Descriptions>
</Hotel>

And here is my Ruby program:

require 'rubygems'
require 'nokogiri'
require 'ap'
include Nokogiri

class Hotel < Nokogiri::XML::SAX::Document

    def initialize
        @h = {}
        @h["Images"] = Array.new([])
        @h["Descriptions"] = Array.new([])
        @desc = {}
    end

    def end_document
      ap @h
        puts "Finished..."
    end

    def start_element(element, attributes = [])
        @element = element

    @desc = {} if element == "Description"
    end

    def end_element(element, attributes = [])     
      @h["Images"] << @characters if element == "Image"
    @desc["Name"] = @characters if element == "Name"
    if element == "Value"
      @desc["Value"] = @characters
      @h["Descriptions"] << @desc
    end

    @h[element] = @characters unless %w(Images Image Descriptions Description Hotel Name Value).include? element
    end

    def characters(string)
        @characters = string
    end  
end

# Create a new parser
parser = Nokogiri::XML::SAX::Parser.new(Hotel.new)

# Feed the parser some XML
parser.parse(File.open("/Users/cbmeeks/Projects/shared/data/text/HotelDatabase_EN/00/1040900.xml", 'rb'))

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I stripped down the XML because it had a lot of unnecessary nodes for the problem. Here's a sample of how I go after text:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
# encoding: UTF-8

xml =<<EOT
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Hotel>
  <Descriptions>
    <Description>
      <Name>General Description</Name>
      <Value>The Copthorne Aberdeen enjoys a location proximate to several bars, restaurants and other diversions. This Aberdeen hotel is located on the city’s West End, roughly a mile from the many opportunities to engage in sightseeing or simply shopping the day away. The Aberdeen International Airport is approximately 10 miles from the Copthorne Hotel in Aberdeen.

There are 89 rooms in total at the Copthorne Aberdeen Hotel. Each of the is provided with direct-dial telephone service, trouser presses, coffee and tea makers and a private bath with a bathrobe and toiletries courtesy of the hotel. The rooms are light in color.

The Hotel Copthorne Aberdeen offers its guests a restaurant where they can enjoy their meals in a somewhat formal setting. For something more laid-back, guests may have a drink and a light meal in the hotel bar. This hotel does offer business services and there are rooms for meetings located onsite. The hotel also provides a secure parking facility for those who arrive by private car.</Value>
    </Description>
    <Description>
      <Name>LocationDescription</Name>
      <Value>Aberdeen's premier four star hotel located in the city centre just off Union Street and the main business and entertainment areas. Within 10 minutes journey of Aberdeen Railway Station and only 10-20 minutes journey from International Airport.</Value>
    </Description>
  </Descriptions>
</Hotel>
EOT

require 'nokogiri'

doc = Nokogiri::XML(xml)
puts doc.search('Value').map{ |n| n.text }

With a sample of the output:

The Copthorne Aberdeen enjoys a location proximate to several bars, restaurants and other diversions. This Aberdeen hotel is located on the city’s West End, roughly a mile from the many opportunities to engage in sightseeing or simply shopping the day away. The Aberdeen International Airport is approximately 10 miles from the Copthorne Hotel in Aberdeen.

There are 89 rooms in total at the Copthorne Aberdeen Hotel. Each of the is provided with direct-dial telephone service, trouser presses, coffee and tea makers and a private bath with a bathrobe and toiletries courtesy of the hotel. The rooms are light in color.

The Hotel Copthorne Aberdeen offers its guests a restaurant where they can enjoy their meals in a somewhat formal setting. For something more laid-back, guests may have a drink and a light meal in the hotel bar. This hotel does offer business services and there are rooms for meetings located onsite. The hotel also provides a secure parking facility for those who arrive by private car. Aberdeen's premier four star hotel located in the city centre just off Union Street and the main business and entertainment areas. Within 10 minutes journey of Aberdeen Railway Station and only 10-20 minutes journey from International Airport.

This purposely only goes after the Value nodes. It'd be simple to modify the sample to grab the image nodes too.

Now, a couple questions: Why use SAX mode? Is the incoming XML bigger than can reasonably fit into the RAM of your host? If not, use DOM as it's much easier to use.

When I ran it the first time, Ruby told me invalid multibyte char (US-ASCII), meaning there's something in the XML it didn't like. I fixed that by adding the # encoding line. I'm using Ruby 1.9.2, which makes it easier to deal with such things.

I'm using CSS accessors for the search. Nokogiri allows XPath and CSS, so you're free to indulge your XML-parsing heart's desire however you want.

share|improve this answer
    
No real reason why I'm using SAX. Other than I have 200k of these to parse. :-) Would love an example using the DOM that could turn that XML file into a Ruby object –  cbmeeks Apr 7 '11 at 0:47
    
@cbmeeks, "Would love an example using the DOM that could turn that XML file into a Ruby object" Why? It's really so simple to rip through a DOM and grab what is needed that I've never wanted an XML to object converter. I used to use them in Perl, and hear that Rails can do it but I just don't see the point; I've written some big apps parsing a lot of flavors of RDF/RSS/Atom feeds using Nokogiri and it handled the job without a fuss. –  the Tin Man Apr 7 '11 at 0:51
    
I guess my last experience was using a Java DOM parser and it was a pain. I will look for some DOM Ruby tutorials too –  cbmeeks Apr 7 '11 at 0:57
    
If you know CSS use CSS accessors. Otherwise, an XPath tutorial will get you up and running. That's what is cool about Nokogiri, both work. I've used Java DOM parsers, and yes, the ones I used made me want to gouge out my eyes. Nokogiri is MUCH less painful. –  the Tin Man Apr 7 '11 at 4:16

I ran into a similar problem, and here is the actual explanation:

def characters(string)
    @characters = string
end

Should actually be something like this:

def start_element(element, attributes = [])     
  #...(other stuff)...

  # Reset/initialize @characters
  @characters = ""
end

def characters(string)
    @characters += string
end

The rationale is that the contents of the tag may in fact be split into multiple text nodes, as described here: http://nokogiri.org/Nokogiri/XML/SAX/Document.html

This method might be called multiple times given one contiguous string of characters.

Only the last segment of the text body was being captured because each time it encountered a text node (i.e. the characters method is called) it replaced the contents of @characters instead of appending to it.

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