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I am learning common lisp and tried to implement a swap value function to swap two variables' value. Why the following does not work?

(defun swap-value (a b)
           (setf tmp 0)
             (progn
              ((setf tmp a)
               (setf a b)
               (setf b tmp))))

Error info:

in: LAMBDA NIL
;     ((SETF TMP A) (SETF A B) (SETF B TMP))
; 
; caught ERROR:
;   illegal function call

;     (SB-INT:NAMED-LAMBDA SWAP-VALUE
;         (A B)
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1  
I don't know Common Lisp well enough to tell you why you are getting that error, but I can tell you that this will not swap the two variables' values even if you fix the error, because the arguments to swap-value are passed by value, so they won't affect the bindings outside the call; (swap-value x y) will pass in the values of x and y, having no effect on what x is bound to. To get the effect you want, you will have to write a macro. –  dfan Apr 7 '11 at 1:31
    
Nice point. What surprised me there is I think setf is a global-wide assigner. I am still stuck in a C programmer's mindset. Anybody can elaborate Lisp's Way to do value assignment? –  lkahtz Apr 7 '11 at 1:44
    
setf is the Lisp way to do value assignment, but it's not the way to introduce global variable. You should use defvar or defparameter for introducing global (and special, aka dynamic variables). This is a bit too complicated to explain in a comment, but check out Practical Common Lisp: gigamonkeys.com/book/variables.html –  spacemanaki Apr 7 '11 at 1:56
    
When coming to Common Lisp from more procedural languages, many tend to overuse setf for assignments. I suggest taking a moment when using setf to consider whether there are more idiomatic ways to implement the same functionality. Like using let to bind a local variable. –  Terje Norderhaug Apr 7 '11 at 4:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

dfan is right, this isn't going to swap the two values.

The reason you are getting that error though is that this:

(progn
  ((setf tmp a)
   (setf a b)
   (setf b tmp)))

should be this:

(progn
  (setf tmp a)
  (setf a b)
  (setf b tmp))

The first progn has one s-expression in the body, and it's treated as an application of the function (setf tmp a). In Common Lisp, I think that only variables or lambda forms can be in the function position of an application. I could be wrong about the details here, but I know there are restrictions in CL that aren't in Scheme. That's why it's an illegal call.

For instance, this is illegal in CL and results in the same error:

CL-USER> ((if (< 1 2) #'+ #'*) 2 3)
; in: LAMBDA NIL
;     ((IF (< 1 2) #'+ #'*) 2 3)
; 
; caught ERROR:
;   illegal function call
; 
; compilation unit finished
;   caught 1 ERROR condition

You COULD write a swap as a macro (WARNING: I'm a Lisp noob, this might be a terrible reason for a macro and a poorly written one!)

(defmacro swap (a b)
  (let ((tmp (gensym)))
    `(progn
       (setf ,tmp ,a)
       (setf ,a ,b)
       (setf ,b ,tmp))))

Nope! Don't do this. Use rotatef as Terje Norderhaug points out.

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Thanks spacemanaki~ This is such a comprehensive answer. –  lkahtz Apr 7 '11 at 2:23

You can use the ROTATEF macro to swap the values of two places. More generally, ROTATEF rotates the contents of all the places to the left. The contents of the leftmost place is put into the rightmost place. It can thus be used with more than two places.

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Thanks. Very helpful. –  lkahtz Apr 7 '11 at 2:21
    
Not symbols, variables. –  Rainer Joswig Apr 7 '11 at 16:19

A function (rather than macro) swapping two special variables can take the variable symbols as arguments. That is, you quote the symbols in the call. Below is an implementation of such a swap function:

(defvar *a* 1)
(defvar *b* 2)

(defun swap-values (sym1 sym2)
  (let ((tmp (symbol-value sym1)))
    (values
     (set sym1 (symbol-value sym2))
     (set sym2 tmp))))

? (swap-values '*a* '*b*) 
2
1

? *a*
2

Note the use of defvar to define global/special variables and the per convention use of earmuffs (the stars) in their names. The symbol-value function provides the value of a symbol, while set assigns a value to the symbol resulting from evaluating its first argument. The values is there to make the function return both values from the two set statements.

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Thanks a lot Terje~ You make the answer very complete and thorough now. Lispers are so kind~ Studying hard to be one of you guys~~ –  lkahtz Apr 7 '11 at 14:16
3  
This does not work with lexical variables. –  Rainer Joswig Apr 7 '11 at 16:17

You can not use setf to build a lexical variable tmp. You can use let, as follow:

 (defun swap-value (a b)
       (let ((tmp 0))
         (setf tmp a)
         (setf a b)
         (setf b tmp))
       (values a b))

which will do you hope.

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Thanks for this. It looks like -- if I use (setf tmp 0) outside the scope of 'progn, the tmp variable becomes global. I can inspect it under repl. But 'a and 'b is local. Anyone please correct me if I am wrong on this.. Using let is the right way, indeed. –  lkahtz Apr 7 '11 at 2:55
    
Using setf on a symbol outside a scope binding a value to the symbol will indeed create a global variable. Some Common Lisp implementations may issue a warning about the variable not being declared. –  Terje Norderhaug Apr 7 '11 at 4:15
    
In this specific case (take two values, return them in the reversed order, as two return values), it would probably be better to just use (defun swap-values (a b) (values b a)) Also note that neither my function nor @wislin 's function actually change state. –  Vatine Apr 8 '11 at 10:13

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