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All,

I'm a self-taught programmer - not a CS grad - so there are hundreds of coding best practices I probably ignore regularly.

Anyway, here's a general question...

When coding, is it better practice to use more code, or more variables (or arrays, hashes, etc.) to implement logic?

That's a vague question, but here's a specific "for instance..."

I'm building a UI for an RIA; one of the affordances is a series of little dots in a line - each dot is clickable, and works as a nav that allows users to choose a different screen.

(Think of the dots on the bottom of your home screens in your iPhone that lets you switch screens, or the image-switcher nav on this page: http://www.apple.com/ipad/)

Anyway, I've implemented this "dot nav control" as a custom Sprite subclass. When the user clicks a dot, the class dispatches a custom event to the listener that contains an index value (uint) that corresponds to the clicked dot (e.g., "0" is the first dot, "n-1" is the nth dot).

Now, in the listener, I need to take action - navigate the user to the corresponding page. So, one obvious option:

private function dotClicked(e:customDotEvent):void {
    // e.target.index contains the index of the dot clicked
    switch (e.target.index) {
        case 0:
            // navigate the user to the screen that corresponds to dot 0
            loadScreen("home");
            ....
            break;
        case 1:
            // navigate the user to the screen that corresponds to dot 1
            loadScreen("about");
            ....
            break;
        ....
        case n:
            // navigate the user to the screen that corresponds to dot n
            loadScreen("etc");
            ....
            break;
    }

In this example - I have a fairly verbose switch function that gets the job done.

A less verbose option:

private function dotClicked(e:customDotEvent):void {
    var screens:Array = ["home","about","blog",...,"etc"];
    // e.target.index contains the index of the dot clicked
    loadScreen(screens[e.target.index]);
}

In the second option - I've obviously got less code, but additional memory is required to store the "screens" array (albeit just for the duration of the function).

(Obviously, there are probably numerous better alternatives as well, but hopefully this illustrates my question...).

So, in general, what's better for performance, reducing the overall memory footprint of the app, etc.?

In this simple example, the difference is probably trivial. But could it add up in a large application?

Is Flash (or other platforms) better at handling more code, or more variables?

Is this worth worrying about, or should I just worry about writing code that's easier to maintain and debug?

Many thanks in advance!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I had to think for a bit about what you were getting at - I understand where you're coming from, but performance in this case is trivial.

(Note: "Performance is trivial" is one of those weasel statements...but just go with it for now, trust me. We can worry about performance and memory footprints after we've tackled the big thing.)

In this case, you probably shouldn't worry about memory or computation speed. This isn't only because you're dealing with small data, but because you need to worry more about possibly having to extend your code. If you had hundreds of pages, or even thousands, would you really want to have to add a switch case statement for each one? No. But...would you really want to have to add an element, a string of all things, to an array for each new iteration? No.

In this case, I would go for code maintainability over performance or memory footprint, because it's trivial. (There it is again.) It's trivial because there are bigger performance hits that you'll want to worry about before you sacrifice code maintainability to deal with this issue. Your second example is better than the first because you aren't reusing code, which is good. However, you could take it a step further; instead of defining your location ("home", etc.) in an array, and using an index in your Dot class to reference the array key that holds the location, why not define the location as a variable within the Dot class itself? This decouples your objects from your DotClicked function, opening more options and making your code easier to maintain in the long run. You'd call it using something like this:

private function dotClicked(e:customDotEvent):void {
    // e.target.location contains the target location of the dot clicked, e.g. "home", "about", "etc"
    loadScreen(e.target.location);
}

Using this method, you don't create a new array each time you call your function (which should save the garbage collector from running), and you also don't have to iterate through a switch-case statement (that you have to edit each time you make a change), and you don't have to worry about translating indices to strings, etc....and, in the process, you get better code.

That was terribly long and drawn out, and if you've gotten this far, I applaud you (and apologize, as well). In a nutshell, my answer to "is it better practice to use more code, or more variables (or arrays, hashes, etc.) to implement logic" is this - if you can manage it, it's probably better practice to use less of both.

Best of luck.

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Lunchmeat - thanks for this terrific answer - VERY clear and helpful. –  mattstuehler Apr 7 '11 at 15:31
    
But it's a good example of what I'm talking about. As I understand your suggestion, you're adding a "property" to each dot - a variable that defines the location associated with the dot. This makes for more elegant code. However, the application is now responsible for storing that variable for the entirety of the application's life. So, what's less overhead - the extra code of the switch (option 1), the work of creating the array each time (option 2), or the memory of storing the extra variables as dot properties (option 3)? –  mattstuehler Apr 7 '11 at 15:58
    
As you suggested - it's probably trivial, in comparison to the significant benefit of making my code more explicit, elegant, and maintainable –  mattstuehler Apr 7 '11 at 15:59
    
@matt Slippery question - slippery answer. Each solution provides a different type of overhead - switch case blocks use compile-time constants, but have to iterate through logic. Arrays have higher memory overhead but seek directly to a key. Class calls are better for memory, but create abstraction overhead. The main focus here is not the overhead of each method; the focus is to eliminate the lookup step - by passing the value directly instead of having to look it up via array key, you make your code faster. You go from point A to B, instead of going from A to C to B. –  jedd.ahyoung Apr 7 '11 at 19:17
    
As for the more general question - variables vs. code - truthfully, it's probably language-dependent, as well as compiler-dependent. From what I understand, many compilers that optimize actually create more code )via loop unrolling, etc), but they're creating lower-level code. I guess you'd have to check out best practices for performance for specific languages. If you're still concerned, you can begin profiling and unit-testing your code, which should give you more concrete results. –  jedd.ahyoung Apr 7 '11 at 19:18

I think you should worry first about making a code that's easier to maintain and debug in the first place. If you app gets slow, then make optimizations. My strategy is to only optimize the code, that will run a lot. An event listener for a button can execute in 0.001 sec or 0.01 sec, it does not matter. But if a complex code runs in every frame, then optimize it.
With actionscript code execution speed even matters less, because rendering uses up much much more CPU cycles, than algorithms usually (unless you write some app, that does only huge math calculations). For example:

for (var i:int=0;i<500;i++){
    Math.sin(Math.random());
}

is less resource intensive, than

graphics.lineTo(300,300);   

So if you want to optimize, start at the graphics.

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Very true. I noticed coming from C++ development to AS3 that code profiling is far less useful to me in the AS3 environment. More often than not, my apps spend >90% of the time in prerender() and render() such that graphics optimization is the only prescription (and that's often out of my scope of work). –  Adam Smith Apr 7 '11 at 3:07

The less verbose version is definitely preferable because it is much easier to maintain and manage. Worrying about performance of a button is kind of silly, but worrying about ease of debugging and maintenance is important.

Although it isn't always this way, most of the time there is a pretty good correlation between how many lines of code and how much work you have to do to manage it. It's foolish to get so concise that it becomes hard to read the code, but that's only really a concern once you get to the level of shaving a line down from 14 characters to 13.

For what it's worth, in your example you don't have to create a new "screens" array each time. Since that array is always the same, just define it as a constant at the top of your code.

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For your example, you're correct that it is not going to make any performance difference with a few screens. If you had many, many possible arrangements of screens to map the dots to, it would make sense to give them constant integer IDs instead of strings to save memory, and to go with your second approach (array or vector). I believe the AS3 compiler makes switch statements into a big pile o' conditionals (an if, else if cascade), so that is not ideal for performance, and doesn't have much size savings either.

To answer your question more generally, "size vs speed" is a classic software engineering tradeoff. For nearly every software problem, there is a slower way to do things that uses more computation but less memory, and a faster way that uses more memory but fewer calculations. Most compilers for compiled languages like C++ have optimization presets for either speed or size. Optimizing for speed typically gives your application a larger footprint on disc (because it enables optimizations like loop unrolling, redundant in-lining of functions) as well as more runtime memory usage (more caching and pre-computing of things into lookup tables). Optimizing for size results in smaller code that runs slower (e.g. loops and functions are not expanded, and have their usual overhead) and with less caching and precomputing. There is no right answer, you make the size vs speed decision based on the needs of your application and the resources that will be available to it.

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The way you're doing it is fine. The only real thing I'd add is the introduction of constants. Using constants means your code is less prone to errors and makes it more readable for yourself.

For example, if you have a Locations class like this:

public class Locations
{
    public static const HOME:int = 0;
    public static const ABOUT:int = 1;
    public static const ETC:int = 2;
    ...
}

so now your switch becomes:

switch (e.target.index) 
{
    case Locations.HOME:
        // navigate the user to the screen that corresponds to dot 0
        loadScreen("home");
        ....
        break;
    case Locations.ABOUT:
        // navigate the user to the screen that corresponds to dot 1
        loadScreen("about");
        ....
        break;
    ....
}

Much much easier to read, and if you want to change it, you do it all in one area (Locations.as) rather than all over your code

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