Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C#.net I have a mesh cylinder with a dynamic diameter and length and am trying to map a texture to it. I have spent the better part of a day trying to find out how to do so but have had no success finding any information on Google.

The cylinders texture has a top area of the jpg and the side has the rest of the jpg. I need to position the jpgs image edge along the top edge of the cylinder. eg. Red on top and green on side using one image.

Can anyone help me to map the VertexBuffer points to the texture?

C#.Net 2008 DirectX 9 (unmanaged)

I Have Posted My Working Solution Below

share|improve this question
    
Just calculate the texture coordinates. This looks straight-forward. What is the exact problem you are having? Can you post some of your failed results? –  Stephen Chung Apr 7 '11 at 9:08
    
I have figured it out now. The problem is that I suck at maths and was generating the Mesh automatically using DirectX so I had no-idea how the mesh was created or layed out ;) I have posted my new working code below in an answer. –  Craig White Apr 8 '11 at 1:55
    
that's the spirit! You really need to brush up on your math if you want to do graphics programming -- there is just no way around it. –  Stephen Chung Apr 8 '11 at 3:12

2 Answers 2

Although this tutorial is in VB it clearly explains the process.

Calculating the texture coordinates can be quite some work; that is why normally this is done by 3D modeling software so you can easily and, more importantly, visually adjust the mapping.

Let me know if you have any questions.

EDIT

For adding texture coordinates to the DirecxtX generated cylinder see this

share|improve this answer
    
Good information! Reading now. :) –  Craig White Apr 7 '11 at 6:52
    
BTW: what do you mean by unmanaged DirectX? Did you create your own wrapper or are you using a library such as SlimDX? –  Erno de Weerd Apr 7 '11 at 6:55
    
Hmmm... This tutorial refers to attaching a texture to a hollow cylinder. My cylinder has a top and bottom. I am using Microsoft.DirectX.Direct3D.Mesh.Cylinder to create it. Unmanaged is reffering to that we are using the original DirectX libraries and not the .Net Managed version. –  Craig White Apr 7 '11 at 6:57
    
I added another link that might help you with the Microsoft.DirectX.Direct3D.Mesh.Cylinder. So how are you wrapping the unmanaged libraries, PInvoke? –  Erno de Weerd Apr 7 '11 at 7:02
    
I am not sure how we are doing it, the project has been going since 2004. I have only started working on the project recently creating a different module of the project and am implementing 3D models into the display.(There is another comment after this one, press show more to see it) –  Craig White Apr 7 '11 at 7:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, I've finally figured it out. I had some code previously that was working but not exactly what I was wanting from http://channel9.msdn.com/coding4fun/articles/Ask-the-ZMan-Applying-Textures-Part-3

Anyway, I just did some mods to it.

For reference and for those arriving from Google, here you go.

public static float ComputeBoundingSphere(Mesh mesh, out Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3 center)
    {
        // Lock the vertex buffer
        Microsoft.DirectX.GraphicsStream data = null;
        try
        {
            data = mesh.LockVertexBuffer(LockFlags.ReadOnly);
            // Now compute the bounding sphere
            return Geometry.ComputeBoundingSphere(data, mesh.NumberVertices, 
                mesh.VertexFormat, out center);
        }
        finally
        {
            // Make sure to unlock the vertex buffer
            if (data != null)
                mesh.UnlockVertexBuffer();
        }
    }

    private static Mesh SetSphericalTexture(Mesh mesh)
    {
        Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3 vertexRay;
        Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3 meshCenter;
        double phi;
        float u;


        Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3 north = new Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3(0f, 0f, 1f);
        Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3 equator = new Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3(0f, 1f, 0f);
        Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3 northEquatorCross = Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3.Cross(north, equator);

        ComputeBoundingSphere(mesh, out meshCenter);

        using (VertexBuffer vb = mesh.VertexBuffer)
        {
            CustomVertex.PositionNormalTextured[] verts = (CustomVertex.PositionNormalTextured[])vb.Lock(0, typeof(CustomVertex.PositionNormalTextured), LockFlags.None, mesh.NumberVertices);
            try
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < verts.Length; i++)
                {
                    //For each vertex take a ray from the centre of the mesh to the vertex and normalize so the dot products work.
                    vertexRay = Microsoft.DirectX.Vector3.Normalize(verts[i].Position - meshCenter);

                    phi = Math.Acos((double)vertexRay.Z);
                    if (vertexRay.Z > -0.9)
                    {
                        verts[i].Tv = 0.121f; //percentage of the image being the top side
                    }
                    else
                        verts[i].Tv = (float)(phi / Math.PI);

                    if (vertexRay.Z == 1.0f || vertexRay.Z == -1.0f)
                    {
                        verts[i].Tu = 0.5f;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        u = (float)(Math.Acos(Math.Max(Math.Min((double)vertexRay.Y / Math.Sin(phi), 1.0), -1.0)) / (2.0 * Math.PI));
                        //Since the cross product is just giving us (1,0,0) i.e. the xaxis 
                        //and the dot product was giving us a +ve or -ve angle, we can just compare the x value with 0
                        verts[i].Tu = (vertexRay.X > 0f) ? u : 1 - u;
                    }
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                vb.Unlock();
            }
        }
        return mesh;
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.