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I am new to using Unity and IoC/DI concepts. I started with the concept by rolling my own via James Kovacs' show on dnrTV in a test.

His example had the Container run as a singleton accessed through a static method in an IoC class so you could register types at a startup and resolve the type throughout your application.

I know this was not full featured and was to mainly show the concepts of IoC.

I am now attempting to use Unity in a project.

In my Main() I create a new container, but once my WinForms opens, the container falls out of scope and is disposed. Later on in the program, when I try to resolve a type I no longer have the original container and its registered types.

Is there a concept or implementation construct I am missing?

My current thought is to create something like this:

public static class Container
{
    private static readonly object syncRoot = new object();
    private static volatile IUnityContainer instance;

    public static IUnityContainer Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (instance == null)
            {
                lock (syncRoot)
                {
                    if (instance == null)
                    {
                        instance = new UnityContainer();
                    }
                }
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }
}

I'm pretty sure this will work, it just doesn't seem right.

Thank you,
Keith

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1 Answer 1

I use a static class for just that same reason - to avoid it going out of scope.

The one difference I make to you is that I wrap all the unity calls and add checks to see if unity is already configured, as you'll see here:

using System.Configuration;
using Microsoft.Practices.Unity;
using Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration;

namespace Utilities
{
    public static class ServiceLocator
    {
    	private static IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
    	private static bool isConfigured;

    	public static void Clear()
    	{
    		container = new UnityContainer();
    	}

    	private static IUnityContainer Container
    	{
    		get
    		{
    			if (!isConfigured)
    			{
    				ConfigureContainer();
    			}
    			return container;
    		}
    	}

    	public static T Resolve<T>()
    	{
    		return Container.Resolve<T>();
    	}

    	public static T Resolve<T>(string name)
    	{
    		return Container.Resolve<T>(name);
    	}

    	public static void AddInstance<T>(object instance)
    	{
    		Container.RegisterInstance(typeof (T), instance);
    	}

    	private static void ConfigureContainer()
    	{
    			UnityConfigurationSection section = (UnityConfigurationSection) ConfigurationManager.GetSection("unity");
    			section.Containers.Default.Configure(container);
    			isConfigured = true;		
    	}
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I am not configuring my container in the Static Class. I think this gives me flexibility to change the configuration in a Testing situation without having the "production" configuration automatically injected when it is used in a test. –  Keith Sirmons Feb 25 '09 at 15:31
    
Fair enough. Of course, with unit testing you shouldn't really require the container anyway. I understand the need in an integration test scenario however. –  Richard Banks Feb 26 '09 at 7:14

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