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I like to copy the object of first vector to second vector but when i delete the second vector , the first vector content should not changed. How can i do this?

CODE:

typedef vector<CLog*> CLogData;

CLogData CMultiThreadedDlg::CopyLogData()
{
CLogData logdata;
for(size_t i = 0; i < m_pThreadInfo->GetLog().size()-1; ++i)
{
  CLog* plog = new CLog(*m_pThreadInfo->GetLog()[i]);
  logdata.push_back(plog);
}
return logdata;
}

DeleteData(logdata); 

void CMultiThreadedDlg::DeleteData(CLogData tLogData)
{
for(size_t i = 0; i < tLogData.size()-1; ++i)
{
    CLog* log = (CLog*)tLogData[i];
    delete log;
}

tLogData.clear();
 }

The problem in my code is that while deleting second vector the first vector namely m_pThreadInfo->getLog() content also deleted..

How to overcome this?

EDIT:

     CLog::CLog()
     {
        m_threadname = new char[20];
     }
     CLog::~CLog()
     {
           delete[ ] m_threadname;
     }

If i use CLog as parameter to vector list ..how can i delete this..

Thanks...

share|improve this question
    
Is this the real code? because it doesn't compile. BTW, how is the copy constructor of CLog class implemented? it does a deep copy? –  Naveen Apr 7 '11 at 6:15
    
this is real application ..I just pasted my functionality here... –  karthik Apr 7 '11 at 6:19
    
Why not std::string ? –  Mahesh Apr 7 '11 at 6:51
    
I assume you meant typedef vector<CLog*> CLogData;, not vector<CLog*> CLogData;... –  Johann Gerell Apr 7 '11 at 7:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Oh, man. There are some serious problems in that code of yours.

First, you have

class CLog
{
    char* m_threadname;

public:

    CLog()
    {
        m_threadname = new char[20];
    }

    ~CLog()
    {
        delete[ ] m_threadname;
    }
};

It's C++ and the year is 2011, please don't do that. And if you do that, don't claim performance as a reason. Instead, do this:

class CLog
{
    std::string m_threadname;
};

See!

Second, you copy vectors with pointer elements aand act surprised when the first vector's elements are gone when the second vector's elements are deleted. It's the same element, you know. The vector is just a container, not an owner. You, as a programmer, own the elements. The vector just holds them.

You can use

typedef vector<shared_ptr<CLog>> CLogData;

To solve your problem. Or, preferrably

typedef vector<CLog> CLogData;

which is even better until proven otherwise. You haven't given a good reason why that's a bad idea.

Use the stack, it's your friend.

Edit:

Furthermore, you need to get your references in order. In

void CMultiThreadedDlg::DeleteData(CLogData tLogData)
{
    for(size_t i = 0; i < tLogData.size()-1; ++i)
    {
        CLog* log = (CLog*)tLogData[i];
        delete log;
    }

    tLogData.clear();
}

you pass vector copy to DeleteData and the copy will be .clear()-ed, not the original. Can be dangerous, if it hangs around and you think it has valid pointers, which it hasn't.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible to hold one lakh record in vector<CLog> ? –  karthik Apr 7 '11 at 7:09
    
+1 for "use the stack.." –  Naveen Apr 7 '11 at 7:16
    
@karthik: Sorry, I can't follow you. Could you please elaborate? –  Johann Gerell Apr 7 '11 at 7:18
    
@naveen : +1 denotes what? –  karthik Apr 7 '11 at 7:18

By having vector<CLog*>, the program is just getting unnecessarily complicated. I suggest you to use vector<CLog> instead of vector<CLog*>. With that modification, you need not worry about explicitly deleting the content of vector. You can just use assignment operator to copy the elements of one vector to another.


On your comment on assignment operation of a vector -

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    foo obj(10) ;

    vector<int> a(5), b(5) ;
    for( int i=0 ; i<5; ++i )
        a[i] = i ;

    b = a;  // Assignment 

    cout << b[2] << "\t" << a[2] << "\n";

    b[2] = 25;

    cout << b[2] << "\t" << a[2] << "\n";

    return 0 ;
}

Output :

2 2
25 2

See that modifying vector b is not affecting a. So, your comment isn't correct that assignment operation modifies the other vector too if the type is CLog.

Since an the class has an element char*, assignment operation doesn't do a deep copy. Use std::string instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry i have to use in many classes and many files...so i need to use CLog* and moreover If we use CLog and use assignment operator then change in one vector affect the content of another vector.. –  karthik Apr 7 '11 at 6:16
    
AFAIK, Access to many files has nothing to do with CLog*? Assignment (=) operation copies the content of one vector to another. So, there is no affect on the other vector if one vector is getting modified. Try a very simple program and see it. –  Mahesh Apr 7 '11 at 6:21
    
Inside CLog class i am using two char * variables namely threadname and message ...how can i delete this? –  karthik Apr 7 '11 at 6:44
    
Mostly avoid usage of raw pointers. Use std::string instead. –  Mahesh Apr 7 '11 at 6:50
    
Try to give the solution for CLog*...for the last chance i will use your logic....Help for CLog* issue –  karthik Apr 7 '11 at 6:56

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