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regex replace all ignore case

I need to replace all occurrences of Sony Ericsson with a tilda in between them. This is what I have tried

String outText="";
    String inText="Sony Ericsson is a leading company in mobile. The company sony ericsson was found in oct 2001";
    String word = "sony ericsson";
    outText = inText.replaceAll(word, word.replaceAll(" ", "~"));
    System.out.println(outText);

The output of this is

Sony Ericsson is a leading company in mobile. The company sony~ericsson was found in oct 2001

But what I want is

Sony~Ericsson is a leading company in mobile. The company sony~ericsson was found in oct 2001

It should ignore cases & give the desired output.

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possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/5568081/… –  amit Apr 7 '11 at 7:20
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marked as duplicate by Daniel Hilgarth, Jeff Atwood Apr 8 '11 at 9:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change it to

outText = inText.replaceAll("(?i)" + word, word.replaceAll(" ", "~"));

to make the search / replace case insensitive.

String outText="";
String inText="Sony Ericsson is a leading company in mobile. " +
              "The company sony ericsson was found in oct 2001";
String word = "sony ericsson";
outText = inText.replaceAll("(?i)" + word, word.replaceAll(" ", "~"));
System.out.println(outText);

Output:

sony~ericsson is a leading company in mobile.
The company sony~ericsson was found in oct 2001

Avoid ruining the original capitalization:

In the above approach however, you're ruining the capitalization of the replaced word. Here is a better suggestion:

String inText="Sony Ericsson is a leading company in mobile. " +
              "The company sony ericsson was found in oct 2001";
String word = "sony ericsson";

Pattern p = Pattern.compile(word, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
Matcher m = p.matcher(inText);

StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();

while (m.find()) {
  String replacement = m.group().replace(' ', '~');
  m.appendReplacement(sb, Matcher.quoteReplacement(replacement));
}
m.appendTail(sb);

String outText = sb.toString();

System.out.println(outText);

Output:

Sony~Ericsson is a leading company in mobile.
The company sony~ericsson was found in oct 2001
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@ajoobe: Awesome! how do I thank you buddy? –  lambda123 Apr 7 '11 at 7:37
    
Hehe, no problem. My pleasure. –  aioobe Apr 7 '11 at 7:42
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str.replaceAll(regex, repl) is equal to Pattern.compile(regex).matcher(str).replaceAll(repl). Thus, you can make your matcher case-insensitive with a flag:

Pattern.compile(regex, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE).matcher(str).replaceAll(repl)

Using backreferences to preserve case:

Pattern.compile("(sony) (ericsson)", Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE)
       .matcher(str)
       .replaceAll("$1~$2")

Gives:

Sony~Ericsson is a leading company in mobile. The company sony~ericsson was found in oct 2001

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Thank you Sir for your help –  lambda123 Apr 7 '11 at 7:38
    
That's an elegant solution! However, it becomes trickier to use if the word variable is actually an argument to a function. –  aioobe Apr 7 '11 at 7:44
    
@aioobe Thank you. And yes, you're right; in order for this to work, the string to match ("sony ericcson") must be known so that groups can be defined ("(sony) (ericsson)"). That would be tricky (at best!) if "sony ericcson" came from "the outside" (e.g., an external argument to a function). –  jensgram Apr 7 '11 at 7:48
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String outText = inText.replaceAll("(?i)(Sony) (Ericsson)", "$1~$2");

Output:

Sony~Ericsson is a leading company in mobile. The company Sony~ericsson was found in oct 2001
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Thank you John for your suggestion –  lambda123 Apr 7 '11 at 7:37
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