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I can't understand why this code:

x='aaaa'
try: 
    self.assertTrue(x==y)
except: 
    print (x)

generates me this error

AssertionError: False is not True

It should be handle it by

print(x)

EDIT

original code is:

try:
    self.assertTrue('aaaa'==self.compare_object_name[1])
except:
    print ('aaa')

@Space_C0wb0y I can't give you full code because it is not my code, and I don't have a permission.

share|improve this question
    
This looks like it is from a unit-test? Why would you want to catch such an assertion? Also, is this your original code? There was a syntax error in it, and also the indentation is weird. Please show us actual code that reproduces the be behavior. –  Björn Pollex Apr 7 '11 at 8:09

1 Answer 1

You should include the code that defines the assertTrue method. From the output you get, I'd say that it actually does not throw an exception, but deals with it internally (thus the error message being printed, and not your value).

You can use the built-in assert statement of Python, which works as expected:

x = 'aaaa'
y = 'bbb'

try:
    assert(x == y)
except:
    print (x)

Output:

>>> 
aaaa
share|improve this answer
    
assert is a statement, not a method. –  John Machin Apr 7 '11 at 9:19
    
You're right, let me correct that ! –  Wookai Apr 7 '11 at 9:25
3  
Be careful with the assert statement... if you ever compile your code with the -O (or -OO) option, they all disappear (by design). See the docs. –  Russ Jan 16 '12 at 4:49

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