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I'm very new to C++, boost etc.

I would like to know if there is already a function in boost or STL I can use to determine if a string is numeric.

Numeric strings may look like: 100

or

100.52

I know there are tons of examples how to write such a function but I would like to know if there is already a function I can use for this.

I'm looking for a pure C++-solution, not C.

[UPDATE: I'm already using lexical_cast to convert my strings, I'm just wondering if there is a method like is_numeric I can use for this...]

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Just wondering, what's wrong with a C solution? –  Mehrdad Apr 7 '11 at 8:11
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/3010481 –  Björn Pollex Apr 7 '11 at 8:12
2  
@Mehrdad: I don't like mixing C with C++. Just a personal point of view. –  Inno Apr 7 '11 at 8:21
    
Huh, ok. –  Mehrdad Apr 7 '11 at 8:23
    
Thanks for voting up my comment, whoever did it... :) –  Inno Apr 8 '11 at 8:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, there's not a ready-made way to do this directly.

You could use boost::lexical_cast<double>(your_string) and if it throws an exception then your string is not a double.

    bool is_a_number = false;
    try
    {
        lexical_cast<double>(your_string);
        is_a_number = true;
    }
    catch(bad_lexical_cast &)
    {
        // if it throws, it's not a number.
    }
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3  
This is a quick solution. There is considerable overhead in doing this (copies + stringstreams + exceptions), and this kind of stuff is often used in loops. Moreover, exception fascists will tell you that you're using an exception for flow control and not for exceptional cases. –  Alexandre C. Apr 7 '11 at 8:41
    
@Alexandre Sure, and very worth pointing out, but the OP didn't list any efficiency constraints. –  Matt Curtis Apr 7 '11 at 8:52
    
Hi Alexandre, Hi Matt, I justed wanted to know if I have to invent the wheel :). But nonetheless your advice is very welcome, Alexandre! –  Inno Apr 8 '11 at 8:08
1  
@Inno Sure! It does seem like the kitchen sink is hidden inside the standard library and boost, but when you take a look under the sink some of the pipes aren't connected :-) –  Matt Curtis Apr 8 '11 at 11:02

boost::regex (or std::regex, if you have C++0x) can be used; you can defined what you want to accept (e.g. in your context, is "0x12E" a number or not?). For C++ integers:

"\\s*[+-]?([1-9][0-9]*|0[0-7]*|0[xX][0-9a-fA-F]+)"

For C++ floating point:

"\\s*[+-]?([0-9]+\\.[0-9]*([Ee][+-]?[0-9]+)?|\\.[0-9]+([Ee][+-]?[0-9]+)?|[0-9]+[Ee][+-]?[0-9]+)"

But depending on what you're doing, you might not need to support things that complex. The two examples you cite would be covered by

"[0-9]+(\\.[0-9]*)?"

for example.

If you're going to need the numeric value later, it may also be just as easy to convert the string into an istringstream, and do the convertion immediately. If there's no error, and you extract all of the characters, the string was a number; if not, it wasn't. This will give you less control over the exact format you want to accept, however.

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1  
+1 for mentioning regexes. :) –  Mephane Apr 7 '11 at 12:20

If performance is a concern at all, I would use boost.spirit.qi rather than std::stringstream:

#include <string>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi_parse.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi_numeric.hpp>

bool is_numeric(std::string const& str)
{
    std::string::const_iterator first(str.begin()), last(str.end());
    return boost::spirit::qi::parse(first, last, boost::spirit::double_)
        && first == last;
}

If you want to allow trailing whitespace then do the following instead:

#include <string>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi_parse.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi_numeric.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi_char_class.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi_operator.hpp>

bool is_numeric(std::string const& str)
{
    std::string::const_iterator first(str.begin()), last(str.end());
    return boost::spirit::qi::parse(first, last,
            boost::spirit::double_ >> *boost::spirit::qi::space)
        && first == last;
}
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You could try a lexical_cast on the string.

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Use a stringstream and return true if the convertion "ate" all the characters in the original string (=eof()).

bool is_numeric(const std::string& str) {
    std::stringstream conv;
    double tmp;
    conv << str;
    conv >> tmp;
    return conv.eof();
}
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Is checking eof() really the Right Thing to do ? –  Stefan Näwe Apr 7 '11 at 8:23
1  
@Stefan: yes. @Helltone: This can be done in one or two lines: ( std::istringstream( str ) >> num ).ws().eof(). Note the call to ws to strip off trailing spaces, this is optional. (However, this shortcut misses empty or all-whitespace strings. Likewise, your more complete implementation should return conv && conv.eof().) –  Potatoswatter Apr 7 '11 at 8:40
    
@Stefan In this case, it's probably appropriate; I'd use return conv.get() == EOF; but the difference is probably one of style more than anything else. –  James Kanze Apr 7 '11 at 8:54
    
This is actually what lexical_cast does. –  Alexandre C. Apr 7 '11 at 9:04
2  
@Alexandr C. Except that lexical_cast reports the error via an exception; if I understand the question, this is not an exceptional case. Adding the necessary try/catch code ends up requiring as many lines as doing the job yourself. (On the other hand, lexical_cast does the job correctly; if you don't know iostream that well---and judging from other questions and answers, a lot of people don't---then that may be an important point to consider.) –  James Kanze Apr 7 '11 at 11:11
bool is_numeric(std::string number)
{
    char* end = 0;
    std::strtod(number.c_str(), &end);

    return end != 0 && *end == 0;
}


bool is_integer(std::string number)
{
    return is_numeric(number.c_str()) && std::strchr(number.c_str(), '.') == 0;
}

Source

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