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c++

  typedef struct 
    {  
      int var;  

      union  
      {  
         int a;  
         char b[25];  
      } myUnion;  
    } myStruct;  

I forgot to mentioned (my fault!) that if i'm gonna use this to call a function from a DLL (API) and pass this struct as an argument (REF). Marshalling. How should I construct this...? It is said that value types and reference types cannot be on the same FieldOffSet.

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]  
public struct myStruct 
{  
   public int var;  

   [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]  
   public struct myStruct 
   { 
     [FieldOffSet(0)]       
     public int a; 

     [FieldOffSet(0)] 
     [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = size+ 1)] 
     public string b; 
   }  
}  
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1  
presumably, you meant to declare that as a union... –  justin Apr 7 '11 at 8:15
    
Ryan, where is union? –  Anton Semenov Apr 7 '11 at 9:01
    
yeah! sorry its UNION not struct...will change that. –  Ryan Apr 7 '11 at 9:22
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closed as not a real question by Tony The Lion, Daniel Hilgarth, DeadMG, David Rodríguez - dribeas, user7116 Apr 7 '11 at 15:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers

you can use this if you need just string for b

struct mystruct
{
   int a;
   string b;
}

if you need b as buffer of characters or bytes

struct mystruct
{
   int a;
   char[] b=new char[25];//or byte[] b=new byte[25]
}

this is depending on the usage of b char in c# is unicode like [wchar_t in c++] byte is the same as c++ char

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Thanks Ahmed!!! This one will work on c# environment. But i forgot to mentioned (my fault!) that if i'm gonna use this to call a function from a DLL (API) and pass this struct as an argument (REF). Marshalling. How should I construct this...? –  Ryan Apr 7 '11 at 8:24
    
try byte[] b = new byte[25] . if it works just sign my answer as accepted answer –  ahmedsafan86 Apr 7 '11 at 8:28
    
the attributes are very important but i dealt with native environment when dealing with HID usb devices and its connection to PC we developed the firmware and the host application structs like this i didn't use attributes at all and it worked all of it some times u need to use attributes but in such struct i think you need it . i had a lot of coding for c# with native API and also C++.NET its fantastic but unfortunately its not with me now its at home. –  ahmedsafan86 Apr 7 '11 at 8:35
    
This is definitely not correct, because char[25] is an in-place value and both string and char[] are references. –  DeadMG Apr 7 '11 at 8:41
    
Thanks Ahmed! really appreciate your reply. Thanks also to you DeadMG. By the way, I updated my post with additional info above. –  Ryan Apr 7 '11 at 8:46
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You need to use an unsafe fixed-size buffer buffer.

unsafe struct mystruct {
    int a;
    fixed byte b[25];
};

Because a char[25] is most assuredly NOT marshallable from a .NET string, as a string is a reference but char[25] is an in-place value. A C++ int is 32bit like in C# so that doesn't need any marshal type changing, and a C++ char becomes a C# byte. Also, don't mess with the FieldOffset or anything like that unless the C++ source code also contained alignment/packing alterations in it.

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THanks a lot DeadMG! I learned new stuff now. :) sorry im still a noob. By the way, is there any way that i could convert this without using UNSAFE? –  Ryan Apr 7 '11 at 8:54
    
The ByValTStr type is used for inline, fixed-length character arrays that appear within a structure. Also i used the [FieldOffSet] because i'm creating a UNION in c# that share same chunk of memory. Please correct me if im wrong as i just have read this in the internet... –  Ryan Apr 7 '11 at 10:58
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