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I have a question of using switch case for instanceof object:

For example: my problem can be reproduced in Java:

if(this instanceof A)
    doA();
else if(this instanceof B)
    doB();
else if(this instanceof C)
    doC():

How would it be implemented using switch...case?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Better to use this only here –  Jigar Joshi Apr 7 '11 at 10:06
2  
If you really feel you need a switch you could hash the class name to an int and use that, watch out for possible clashes though. Adding as comment rather than an answer as I don't like the idea of this actually been used. Maybe what you really need is the visitor pattern. –  vickirk Apr 7 '11 at 10:13
    
As of java 7 you could even switch on the fully qualified class name to avoid such hash clashes as @vickirk pointed out, but it's still ugly. –  Mitja Jun 2 at 16:14

11 Answers 11

up vote 79 down vote accepted

This is a typical scenario where subtype polymorphism helps. Do the following

interface I {
  void do();
}

class A implements I { void do() { doA() } ... }
class B implements I { void do() { doB() } ... }
class C implements I { void do() { doC() } ... }

Then you can simply call do() on this.

If you are not free to change A, B, and C, you could apply the visitor pattern to achieve the same.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, this works out! thanks! –  olidev Apr 13 '11 at 10:12
    
Visitor pattern means that A,B and C have to implement an interface with an abstract method that takes a Visitor as an input parameter, what if you cannot change A,B,C and none of them implements that interface? –  thermz Aug 7 at 10:11

if you absolutely cannot code to an interface, then you could use an enum as an intermediary:

public A() {

    CLAZZ z = CLAZZ.valueOf(this.getClass().getSimpleName());
    switch (z) {
    case A:
        doA();
        break;
    case B:
        doB();
        break;
    case C:
        doC();
        break;
    }
}


enum CLAZZ {
    A,B,C;

}
share|improve this answer

Nope, there is no way to do this. What you might want to do is however to consider Polymorphism as a way to handle these kind of problems.

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Just in case if someone will read it:

The BEST solution in java is :

public enum Action { 
    a{
        void doAction(...){
            // some code
        }

    }, 
    b{
        void doAction(...){
            // some code
        }

    }, 
    c{
        void doAction(...){
            // some code
        }

    };

    abstract void doAction (...);
}

The GREAT benefits of such pattern are:

  1. You just do it like (NO switches at all):

    void someFunction ( Action action ) {
        action.doAction(...);   
    }
    
  2. In case if you add new Action called "d" you MUST imlement doAction(...) method

NOTE: This pattern is described in Joshua's Bloch "Effective Java (2nd Edition)"

share|improve this answer
    
nice! Is the @Override required above each implementation of doAction()? –  mateuscb Apr 23 at 21:34

You can't. The switch statement can only contain case statements which are compile time constants and which evaluate to an integer (Up to Java 6 and a string in Java 7).

What you are looking for is called "pattern matching" in functional programming.

See also Avoiding instanceof in Java

share|improve this answer
    
No, in most functional languages you can't pattern match on types, only on constructors. That is at least true in ML and Haskell. In Scala and OCaml it is possible but not the typical application of pattern matching. –  jmg Apr 7 '11 at 10:10
    
Sure, but checking against constructors would be "equivalent" to the scenario described above. –  Carlo V. Dango Apr 7 '11 at 10:12
    
In some cases, but not in general. –  jmg Apr 7 '11 at 10:14

How about this ?

switch (this.name) 
{
  case "A":
    doA();
    break;
  case "B":
    doB();
    break;
  case "C":
    doC();
    break;
  default:
    console.log('Undefined instance');
}
share|improve this answer
    
Should point out that this works only on Java 7. And that you have to call this.getSimpleName() Not sure if the poster is confused with JS (yeah, he's using console, hehe). –  pablisco Feb 15 at 22:44
2  
This has a problem of falling out of source code referential transparency. That is, your IDE won't be able to mantain the reference integrity. Suppose you want to rename your name. The reflection is evil. –  Val Mar 2 at 14:05

Using switch statements like this is not the object oriented way. You should instead use the power of polymorphism. Simply write

this.do()

Having previously set up a base class:

abstract class Base {
   abstract void do();
   ...
}

which is the base class for A, B and C:

class A extends Base {
    void do() { this.doA() }
}

class B extends Base {
    void do() { this.doB() }
}

class C extends Base {
    void do() { this.doC() }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@jmg suggeests (stackoverflow.com/questions/5579309/switch-instanceof/…) using an interface instead of an abstract base class. That can be superior in some circusmtances. –  Raedwald Apr 7 '11 at 10:15

You can't a switch only works with the byte, short, char, int, String and enumerated types (and the object versions of the primitives, it also depends on your java version, Strings can be switched on in java 7)

share|improve this answer
2  
not even on strings yet –  Bozho Apr 7 '11 at 10:08
    
You can't switch on Strings in Java 6. And you can't switch on "object versions of the primitives". –  Lukas Eder Apr 7 '11 at 10:13
    
@Bozho I did say it depends on your java version, in Java 7 you can switch on Strings. –  Tnem Apr 7 '11 at 10:17
    
@Lukas Eder check your java spec you can –  Tnem Apr 7 '11 at 10:23
    
ah, sorry, it was not clear enough. –  Bozho Apr 7 '11 at 10:23

I know this is very late but for future readers ...

Beware of the approaches above that are based only on the name of the class of A, B, C ... :

Unless you can guarantee that A, B, C ... (all subclasses or implementers of Base) are final then subclasses of A, B, C ... will not be dealt with.

Even though the if, elseif, elseif .. approach is slower for large number of subclasses/implementers, it is more accurate.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, you should never use the polymorphimsm (aka OOP) –  Val Mar 2 at 13:16

I think there are reasons to use a switch statement. If you are using xText generated Code perhaps. Or another kind of EMF generated classes.

instance.getClass().getName();

returns a String of the Class Implementation Name. i.e: org.eclipse.emf.ecore.util.EcoreUtil

instance.getClass().getSimpleName();

returns the simple represenation i.e: EcoreUtil

share|improve this answer

If you can manipulate the common interface, you could do add in an enum and have each class return a unique value. You won't need instanceof or a visitor pattern.

For me, the logic needed to be in the written in the switch statement, not the object itself. This was my solution:

ClassA, ClassB, and ClassC implement CommonClass

Interface:

public interface CommonClass {
   MyEnum getEnumType();
}

Enum:

public enum MyEnum {
  ClassA(0), ClassB(1), ClassC(2);

  private int value;

  private MyEnum(final int value) {
    this.value = value;
  }

  public int getValue() {
    return value;
  }

Impl:

...
  switch(obj.getEnumType())
  {
    case ClassA:
      ClassA classA = (ClassA) obj;
    break;

    case ClassB:
      ClassB classB = (ClassB) obj;
    break;

    case ClassC:
      ClassC classC = (ClassC) obj;
    break;
  }
...

If you are on java 7, you can put string values for the enum and the switch case block will still work.

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