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I have a piece of XML like so:

<root>
    <foo src=""/>
    <foo src="bar"/>
    <foo />
</root>

I want to know which elements have a src attribute, which are empty and which have values.

The furthest I have come is with

$ xmlstarlet sel -t -m '//foo' -v @src -n foo.xml 

bar

Though that doesn't tell me the third foo is missing the attribute.

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Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete and short solution (one-liner XPath expression) for each case. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 7 '11 at 13:40
    
@Dimitre: "complete": not quite... –  Jean-François Corbett Apr 7 '11 at 15:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This will select the foos with no src attribute.

/root/foo[not(@src)]

For the other two tasks, I would use a mix of the expressions pointed out by @TOUDIdel and @Dimitre Novatchev: /root/foo[@src and string-length(@src)=0] for foos with an empty src, and /root/foo[@src and string-length(@src)!=0] for foos with an src with content in it.

As an aside, I would avoid using the "anywhere" selector, // (not to mention the * wildcard), unless you're sure that this is specifically what you need. // is like making your very eager dog sniff a piece of cloth and telling it, "bring me everything that smells like this, wherever you find it". You won't believe the weird crap it can decide to bring back.

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I love to dog & cloth analogy! =0 –  Dustin Dec 12 '13 at 8:54

want to know which elements have a src attribute, which are empty and which have values.

Elements having a @src attribute wich is empty (no string-value):

//*[@src[not(string())]]

Elements having a @src attribute wich has value (string-value):

//*[string(@src)]

From http://www.w3.org/TR/xpath/#section-String-Functions

A node-set is converted to a string by returning the string-value of the node in the node-set that is first in document order. If the node-set is empty, an empty string is returned.

From http://www.w3.org/TR/xpath/#function-boolean

a string is true if and only if its length is non-zero

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/root/foo[string-length(@src)!=0] return all foo elements have non empty value.

Unfortunately /root/foo[string-length(@src)=0] indicates elements which don't have src attribute and also elements have src attribute but empty.

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Well this doesn't solve the problem then! I need to importantly distinguish between when the attribute is missing and when the attribute is empty. :-) –  hendry Apr 7 '11 at 12:13

Use:

//*[@src and not(string-length(@src))]

This selects all elements in the XML document that have a src attribute whose string-value has length of zero.

//*[@src and string-length(@src)]

This selects all elements in the XML document that have a src attribute whose string-value has length that is not zero.

//*[@src and string-length(normalize-space(@src))]

This selects all elements in the XML document that have a src attribute whose string-value after excluding the starting and ending whitespace has length that is not zero.

//[not(@src)]

This selects all elements in the XML document that don't have a src attribute.

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Still I don't see a method of testing that the src attribute is there at all. :/ I want to flag the <foo /> case for missing the src attribute. –  hendry Apr 7 '11 at 13:48
    
@Hendry: Why, all expressions do test exactly that: someExpr[@src] means: select all nodes that someExpr selects and that have a src attribute. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 7 '11 at 14:37
    
@Dimetre: to spell it out, he means testing that the src attribute is NOT there. Just use the not operator; see my answer. –  Jean-François Corbett Apr 7 '11 at 14:53
1  
@Jean-François-Corbett: Thanks, but this is not what the OP asked in his comment: "a method of testing that the src attribute is there at all" –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 7 '11 at 15:48
    
@hendry: You wrote "I want to know which elements have a src attribute". –  user357812 Apr 7 '11 at 16:50

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