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I have an image of size 144 pixels (I measured the image size using both irfanView and Photoshop).

However, when opened in a window using the following xaml, the image's width, measured both by the ActualWidth parameter and by the same graphic software, is 192 pixels.

It turns out that 141 points = 192 pixels (as 1pt=1.33px).

So it seems like .Net opens the image, measure it size in pixels and draws the image with the same size but in points.

Here is the code:

<Window x:Class="test_image_resizing.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" WindowState="Maximized" Loaded="Window_Loaded">
    <Grid> 
        <Image 
            x:Name="test"  
            VerticalAlignment="Top" 
            HorizontalAlignment="Center" 
            Stretch="None" 
            Source="/test%20image%20resizing;component/Resources/Test.png" />
    </Grid>
</Window>

private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    MessageBox.Show("test=" + test.ActualWidth.ToString());
}
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2 Answers 2

WPF looks at the dpi of the image before displaying it. If you have an image that is 144 pixels wide, saved at 96 dpi; then on most computers, WPF will display it as 144 pixels wide (because most computers are set at 96 dpi screen resolution).

If your image is saved at a different dpi, then WPF will display it at what it thinks is the 'true' size based on your screen resolution. WPF tries to show images at their intended 'inch' size, which takes into account the dpi of the image.

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Thanks, the image was indeed saved as 72dpi. Reverting to 96dpi solved the problem. –  Doigen Apr 10 '11 at 6:11
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You can open the image in Paint.net and then open the Image | Resize... dialog. You can see the DPI there and adjust it if needed.

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