Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to set a value for a final attribute from a Private method called from the Constructor of that Object?

public class FinalTest {
  private final Object a;
  //Constructor
  public FinalTest() {
    setA();
  }

  private void setA() {
    a = new Object;
  }
}

For the above class, compiler gives me an error saying I can't set the value for 'a' from the method.

I understand that its not possible to set value for a final variable from outside a constructor, but in the above case, I am actually doing it in a way within the constructor. So why isn't this allowed?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's not allowed because you could call setA() via some other non-constructor method later on which would violate the final protection. Since final is a compile time enforced operation, the compiler enforces final by forcing initialization to occur in constructors or in-line.

In your simple example, all looks good but if you later updated your class to something like the following, the problem become more obvious...

public class FinalTest {
  private final Object a;
  //Constructor
  public FinalTest() {
    setA();
  }

  private void setA() {
    a = new Object;
  }

  public void doSomething() {
   this.setA(); // not good because a is final
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok. Then why cant the compiler give an error then. i.e. when I am calling serA from another non-constructor method. I guess it must have something to do with the way compiler binds methods, I would like to know more. –  Salman A. Kagzi Apr 7 '11 at 13:54
    
it could but the designers thought the path of least surprise would be best. I would think it odd to add a new method (doSomething) it all of a sudden setA breaks because of how it is called. –  Andrew White Apr 7 '11 at 13:56
add comment

Just a note: The compiler has to assume the worst case scenario. By declaring an attribute "final", the compiler has to ensure that the attribute cannot be modified outside of the constructor.

In a case where the method is called using reflection (for example), the compiler would never see it, ever. It's a lot easier to prove something is possible than impossible, that is why the compiler works the way it does.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Why do you need to set the value of final variable from a private method ? You may do it in this way :

public class FinalTest {
   private final Object a;
   {
      a=new Object();
   }

   //Constructor
   public FinalTest() {
   }
}

In this case the object will be initialized on every FinalTest initialization.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Didn't see this answer...shucks! :/ –  mre Apr 7 '11 at 14:12
add comment

Final checking is done at compile time not at runtime time. In your case compiler can't be sure that setA would not be called from some other method.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.