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I have the following two queries - the original is the first and the second is my slight "upgrade". The first takes nearly a second to run and the second finishes before I can get my finger completely off of the refresh button.

My question: Why?

The only difference between the first and second is that the first uses coalesce to get a value to compare berp.ID_PART_SESSION with and the second uses a union to put two select statements together to accomplish the same thing.

I still think the first one should be quicker (the original reason why I used coalesce) since it seems like it should be doing less work to get to the same result. Considering how weak I am deciphering execution plans, could someone please explain why the second query is so much better than the first?

declare @animator varchar
SELECT TOP 1 @animator = FULL_NAME
FROM T_BERP berp
INNER JOIN dbo.T_INTERV i ON i.ID_INTERV = berp.ID_INTERV
WHERE berp.VERSION = 1
    AND berp.PRINCIPAL = 1
    AND berp.DELETED = 0
    AND berp.CANCELLED = 0
    AND berp.ID_PART_SESSION = (
        select coalesce(pss.ID_PART_SESSION, psst.ID_PART_SESSION)
        from t_bersp b
        LEFT JOIN T_PART_SESSION pss ON b.ID_PART_SESSION = pss.ID_PART_SESSION
        LEFT JOIN T_PSS_TEMP psst ON b.ID_PSS_TEMP = psst.ID_PSS_TEMP
        where ID_BERSP = 4040)

vs

declare @animator varchar
SELECT TOP 1 @animator = FULL_NAME
FROM dbo.T_BERP berp
INNER JOIN dbo.T_INTERV i ON i.ID_INTERV = berp.ID_INTERV
WHERE berp.VERSION = 1
    AND berp.PRINCIPAL = 1
    AND berp.DELETED = 0
    AND berp.CANCELLED = 0
    AND berp.ID_PART_SESSION IN (
        select pss.ID_PART_SESSION
        from dbo.t_bersp b
        LEFT JOIN dbo.T_PART_SESSION pss ON b.ID_PART_SESSION = pss.ID_PART_SESSION
        where ID_BERSP = 4040
        union
        select psst.ID_PART_SESSION
        from dbo.t_bersp b
        LEFT JOIN dbo.T_PSS_TEMP psst ON b.ID_PSS_TEMP = psst.ID_PSS_TEMP
        where ID_BERSP = 4040)
share|improve this question
5  
Whenever I need to compare two queries, it is usually an easy first step to see what the execution plan looks like. I would add the plan to your question once you have it. –  Chris Pitman Apr 7 '11 at 14:27
    
My initial thought was the = in the top vs the IN in the bottom for the subquery, but it's not correlated so I don't think it should matter... –  JNK Apr 7 '11 at 14:32
    
You have another difference in that the first query uses ‘=’ and the second uses ‘IN’. Also as an unrelated warning, using a TOP 1 without an ORDER BY can lead to some very hard to trace bugs. The order in which multiple records are returned is indeterminate if you do not have an order by. It will commonly match the sort order of an index or physical order on disk but there are no guarantees. –  Rozwel Apr 7 '11 at 14:38
    
@RozWel - is there an echo in here regarding = and IN? :) –  JNK Apr 7 '11 at 14:39
    
I have the execution plans but they're large (~450 and ~375 line) xml files. Is it OK to put them in there directly? I can't seem to find a file attachment function... –  Alex In Paris Apr 7 '11 at 14:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm betting it's the coalesce statement. I believe that coalesce will end up getting applied before the where clause. So, it's actually going through each combination of the two tables, and THEN filtering on those that match the where clause.

share|improve this answer
    
That would be an incredibly dumb way for SQL Server to handle things... You may be right and it would explain the mystery but it would surprise me that such a suboptimal thing could be done. –  Alex In Paris Apr 8 '11 at 6:53

It would be difficult to provide a definitive answer without understanding the relative sizes and indices of the various tables in your queries. One possibility: if t_part_session and t_pss_temp are both large, the query optimizer might be doing something inefficient with the two LEFT JOINs in the inner SELECT of your first query.

EDIT to clarify: Yes there are LEFT JOINs in both queries, but my speculation was that having two together (query 1) might adversely affect performance vs the UNION (query 2). Sorry if that wasn't clear initially.

Also, I highly recommend a tool such as the Instant SQL Formatter (combined with the {} icon in StackOverflow's editor) to make the queries in your question easier to read:

DECLARE @animator VARCHAR

SELECT TOP 1 @animator = full_name
FROM   t_berp berp
       INNER JOIN dbo.t_interv i
         ON i.id_interv = berp.id_interv
WHERE  berp.version = 1
       AND berp.principal = 1
       AND berp.deleted = 0
       AND berp.cancelled = 0
       AND berp.id_part_session = (SELECT
           Coalesce(pss.id_part_session, psst.id_part_session)
                                   FROM   t_bersp b
                                          LEFT JOIN t_part_session pss
                                            ON b.id_part_session =
                                               pss.id_part_session
                                          LEFT JOIN t_pss_temp psst
                                            ON b.id_pss_temporaire =
                                               psst.id_pss_temporaire
                                   WHERE  id_bersp = 4040)

vs

DECLARE @animator VARCHAR

SELECT TOP 1 @animator = full_name
FROM   dbo.t_berp berp
       INNER JOIN dbo.t_interv i
         ON i.id_interv = berp.id_interv
WHERE  berp.version = 1
       AND berp.principal = 1
       AND berp.deleted = 0
       AND berp.cancelled = 0
       AND berp.id_part_session IN (SELECT pss.id_part_session
                                    FROM   dbo.t_bersp b
                                           LEFT JOIN dbo.t_part_session pss
                                             ON b.id_part_session =
                                                pss.id_part_session
                                    WHERE  id_bersp = 4040
                                    UNION
                                    SELECT psst.id_part_session
                                    FROM   dbo.t_bersp b
                                           LEFT JOIN dbo.t_pss_temp psst
                                             ON b.id_pss_temporaire =
                                                psst.id_pss_temporaire
                                    WHERE  id_bersp = 4040)  
share|improve this answer
    
-1 - LEFT JOINs are both in the second query too, so your "answer" basically amounts to "I don't know, but please format your code better" –  JNK Apr 7 '11 at 14:37
    
Yes the LEFT JOINs are in both queries, but my speculation was that having two together might adversely affect performance. Sorry if that wasn't clear. For what it's worth, I agree with Chris's comment that an execution plan would go a long way toward solving this. –  Paul Karlin Apr 7 '11 at 14:39
    
Sorry about that, I had tried to format the code and I saw it was doing it with back-quotes so I wrapped my code in back-quotes assuming that was enough. –  Alex In Paris Apr 7 '11 at 14:52
    
No worries, and sorry if my answer came across as arrogant -- obviously I don't have sufficient reputation to edit directly. Just trying to help. Not sure I'm qualified to comment on whether it's OK to paste execution plans either. :-) Also, when I pasted the formatted code from SQL Formatter, the preview mangled it until I used the {}, which looks like it just indented it in the text editor. –  Paul Karlin Apr 7 '11 at 14:55
    
@paul - downvote removed, thanks for clarifying your point. –  JNK Apr 7 '11 at 15:23

You can put both queries into the same batch in SSMS and show execution plan - this will not only let you see them side by side, it will show a relative cost.

I suspect that the IN (UNION) means the second can be easily parallelized.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, that's even more confusing - it's telling me that the first (and slowest) query has a cost (relative to the batch) of 27% and the second query's is 73%. –  Alex In Paris Apr 7 '11 at 15:00
    
@Alex In Paris is that the actual or the estimated? Does the second use parallelism? What do the actual stats look like for reads? –  Cade Roux Apr 7 '11 at 15:10
    
I had the "Include Actual Execution Plan" selected. I don't see any mention of parallel, anywhere. The first query has one item with a think arrow coming from it - a Clustered Index Scan with 42% of that query's cost. 35% for a Clustered Index Seek. The second query has one large item cost: 74% for a Key Lookup. Not sure if any of that helps... –  Alex In Paris Apr 7 '11 at 15:27

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