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Can anyone explain IEnumerable and IEnumerator to me?

for example, when to use it over foreach? what's the difference between IEnumerable and IEnumerator? Why do we need to use it?

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8 Answers 8

Implementing IEnumerable enables you to get an IEnumerator for a list.

IEnumerator allows foreach style sequential access to the items in the list, using the yield keyword.

Before foreach implementation (in Java 1.4, for example), the way to iterate a list was to get an enumerator from the list, then ask it for the "next" item in the list, for as long as the value returned as the next item is not null. Foreach simply does that implicitly as a language feature, in the same way that lock() implements the Monitor class behind the scenes.

I expect foreach works on lists because they implement IEnumerable.

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if its for a list why can't I just use foreach? –  prodev42 Feb 17 '09 at 19:15
    
Seriously you downvoted me for this? Read up on foreach for more specific details. MSDN is probably the best source of info on this subject. –  Neil Barnwell Feb 17 '09 at 19:16
    
.Net duck types the foreach statement, but IEnumerable/IEnumerable<T> is the appropriate way to say that your class can be enumerated. –  user7116 Feb 17 '09 at 19:22
    
no i didnt downvote... –  prodev42 Feb 17 '09 at 19:30
    
@ke42, appologies then for assuming it. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Feb 17 '09 at 19:34

Inheriting from IEnumerable means your class returns an IEnumerator object:

public class People : IEnumerable
{
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
		// return a PeopleEnumerator
    }
}

Inheriting from IEnumerator means your class returns the methods and properties for iteration:

public class PeopleEnumerator : IEnumerator
{
    public void Reset()...

    public bool MoveNext()...

    public object Current...
}

That's the difference anyway.

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1  
Nice, this explains (together with the other posts) how to convert your class into one that you can use "foreach" on to iterate over its contents. –  Contango Nov 14 '10 at 23:46

An object implementing IEnumerable allows others to visited each of its own items through an enumerator. An object implementing IEnumerator is the doing the iteration. It's looping over an enumerable object.

Think of enumerable objects as of lists, stacks, trees.

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Implementing IEnumerable essentially means that the object can be iterated over. This doesn't necessarily mean it is an array as there are certain lists that can't be indexed but you can enumerate them.

IEnumerator is the actual object used to perform the iterations. It controls moving from one object to the next in the list.

Most of the time, IEnumerable & IEnumerator are used transparently as part of a foreach loop.

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IEnumerable implements GetEnumerator. When called, that method will return an IEnumerator which implements MoveNext, Reset and Current.

Thus when your class implements IEnumerable, you are saying that you can call a method (GetEnumerator) and get a new object returned (an IEnumerator) you can use in a loop such as foreach.

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for example, when to use it over foreach?

You don't use IEnumerable "over" foreach. Implementing IEnumerable makes using foreach possible.

When you write code like:

foreach (Foo bar in baz)
{
   ...
}

it's functionally equivalent to writing:

IEnumerator bat = baz.GetEnumerator();
while (bat.MoveNext())
{
   bar = (Foo)bat.Current
   ...
}

By "functionally equivalent," I mean that's actually what the compiler turns the code into. You can't use foreach on baz in this example unless baz implements IEnumerable.

IEnumerable means that baz implements the method

IEnumerator GetEnumerator()

The IEnumerator object that this method returns must implement the methods

bool MoveNext()

and

Object Current()

The first method advances to the next object in the IEnumerable object that created the enumerator, returning false if it's done, and the second returns the current object.

Anything in .Net that you can iterate over implements IEnumerable. If you're building your own class, and it doesn't already inherit from a class that implements IEnumerable, you can make your class usable in foreach statements by implementing IEnumerable (and by creating an enumerator class that its new GetEnumerator method will return).

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6  
I think when the original poster said "over foreach", he meant "when should I call GetEnumerator() / MoveNext() explicitly instead of using a foreach loop." For what it's worth. –  mquander Feb 17 '09 at 19:46
1  
Ah, I think you're right. Well, the answer's implicit in my post: it doesn't matter, since that's what the compiler does anyway. So do what's easiest, i.e. use foreach. –  Robert Rossney Feb 23 '09 at 19:27
1  
excellent explanation! –  blitzkriegz May 7 '09 at 12:24
1  
finally an explantion that makes sense. Thank you! :) –  Mantisimo Mar 29 '11 at 15:50
4  
This answer does not tell the whole story. Enumerable objects need not implement IEnumerable; they only need to have a GetEnumerator method that returns an instance of a type that in turn has a bool MoveNext() method and a Current property of any type. This "duck typing" approach was implemented in C# 1.0 as a way to avoid boxing when enumerating value-type collections. –  phoog Jan 9 '12 at 15:08

A Minor contribution.

As many of them explain about 'when to use' and 'use with foreach'. I thought of adding Another States Difference here as requested in question about the difference between both IEnumerable an IEnumerator.

I created the below code sample based on the below discussion threads.

IEnumerable , IEnumerator vs foreach, when to use what What is the difference between IEnumerator and IEnumerable?

Enumerator preserves the state (iteration position) between function calls while iterations the other hand Enumerable does not.

Here is the tested example with comments to understand.

Experts please add/correct me.

static void EnumerableVsEnumeratorStateTest()
{
    IList<int> numList = new List<int>();

    numList.Add(1);
    numList.Add(2);
    numList.Add(3);
    numList.Add(4);
    numList.Add(5);
    numList.Add(6);

    Console.WriteLine("Using Enumerator - Remembers the state");
    IterateFrom1to3(numList.GetEnumerator());

    Console.WriteLine("Using Enumerable - Does not Remembers the state");
    IterateFrom1to3Eb(numList);

    Console.WriteLine("Using Enumerable - 2nd functions start from the item 1 in the collection");
}

static void IterateFrom1to3(IEnumerator<int> numColl)
{
    while (numColl.MoveNext())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(numColl.Current.ToString());

        if (numColl.Current > 3)
        {
            // This method called 3 times for 3 items (4,5,6) in the collection. 
            // It remembers the state and displays the continued values.
            IterateFrom3to6(numColl);
        }
    }
}

static void IterateFrom3to6(IEnumerator<int> numColl)
{
    while (numColl.MoveNext())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(numColl.Current.ToString());
    }
}

static void IterateFrom1to3Eb(IEnumerable<int> numColl)
{
    foreach (int num in numColl)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(num.ToString());

        if (num>= 5)
        {
            // The below method invokes for the last 2 items.
            //Since it doesnot persists the state it will displays entire collection 2 times.
            IterateFrom3to6Eb(numColl);
        }
    }
}

static void IterateFrom3to6Eb(IEnumerable<int> numColl)
{
    Console.WriteLine();
    foreach (int num in numColl)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(num.ToString());
    }
}
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The IEnumerable and IEnumerator Interfaces

To begin examining the process of implementing existing .NET interfaces, let’s first look at the role of IEnumerable and IEnumerator. Recall that C# supports a keyword named foreach that allows you to iterate over the contents of any array type:

// Iterate over an array of items.
int[] myArrayOfInts = {10, 20, 30, 40};
foreach(int i in myArrayOfInts)
{
   Console.WriteLine(i);
}

While it might seem that only array types can make use of this construct, the truth of the matter is any type supporting a method named GetEnumerator() can be evaluated by the foreach construct.To illustrate, follow me!

Suppose we have a Garage class:

// Garage contains a set of Car objects.
public class Garage
{
   private Car[] carArray = new Car[4];
   // Fill with some Car objects upon startup.
   public Garage()
   {
      carArray[0] = new Car("Rusty", 30);
      carArray[1] = new Car("Clunker", 55);
      carArray[2] = new Car("Zippy", 30);
      carArray[3] = new Car("Fred", 30);
   }
}

Ideally, it would be convenient to iterate over the Garage object’s subitems using the foreach construct, just like an array of data values:

// This seems reasonable ...
public class Program
{
   static void Main(string[] args)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("***** Fun with IEnumerable / IEnumerator *****\n");
      Garage carLot = new Garage();
      // Hand over each car in the collection?
      foreach (Car c in carLot)
      {
         Console.WriteLine("{0} is going {1} MPH",
         c.PetName, c.CurrentSpeed);
      }
      Console.ReadLine();
   }
}

Sadly, the compiler informs you that the Garage class does not implement a method named GetEnumerator(). This method is formalized by the IEnumerable interface, which is found lurking within the System.Collections namespace. Classes or structures that support this behavior advertise that they are able to expose contained subitems to the caller (in this example, the foreach keyword itself). Here is the definition of this standard .NET interface:

// This interface informs the caller
// that the object's subitems can be enumerated.
public interface IEnumerable
{
   IEnumerator GetEnumerator();
}

As you can see, the GetEnumerator() method returns a reference to yet another interface named System.Collections.IEnumerator. This interface provides the infrastructure to allow the caller to traverse the internal objects contained by the IEnumerable-compatible container:

// This interface allows the caller to
// obtain a container's subitems.
public interface IEnumerator
{
   bool MoveNext (); // Advance the internal position of the cursor.
   object Current { get;} // Get the current item (read-only property).
   void Reset (); // Reset the cursor before the first member.
}

If you want to update the Garage type to support these interfaces, you could take the long road and implement each method manually. While you are certainly free to provide customized versions of GetEnumerator(), MoveNext(), Current, and Reset(), there is a simpler way. As the System.Array type (as well as many other collection classes) already implements IEnumerable and IEnumerator, you can simply delegate the request to the System.Array as follows:

using System.Collections;
...
public class Garage : IEnumerable
{
   // System.Array already implements IEnumerator!
   private Car[] carArray = new Car[4];
   public Garage()
   {
      carArray[0] = new Car("FeeFee", 200);
      carArray[1] = new Car("Clunker", 90);
      carArray[2] = new Car("Zippy", 30);
      carArray[3] = new Car("Fred", 30);
   }
   public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
   {
      // Return the array object's IEnumerator.
      return carArray.GetEnumerator();
   }
}

After you have updated your Garage type, you can safely use the type within the C# foreach construct. Furthermore, given that the GetEnumerator() method has been defined publicly, the object user could also interact with the IEnumerator type:

// Manually work with IEnumerator.
IEnumerator i = carLot.GetEnumerator();
i.MoveNext();
Car myCar = (Car)i.Current;
Console.WriteLine("{0} is going {1} MPH", myCar.PetName, myCar.CurrentSpeed);

However, if you prefer to hide the functionality of IEnumerable from the object level, simply make use of explicit interface implementation:

IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
{
  // Return the array object's IEnumerator.
  return carArray.GetEnumerator();
}

By doing so, the casual object user will not find the Garage’s GetEnumerator() method, while the foreach construct will obtain the interface in the background when necessary.

Adapted from the Pro C# 5.0 and the .NET 4.5 Framework

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