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My DecimalFormat is sometimes returning a '?' when trying to format(). Is there an input that would create this scenario?

For example:

DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.####");
df.format(X); // output : '?'

What could X possibly be?

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What is X, how is it declared, and how defined? –  user unknown Apr 7 '11 at 16:11
    
Could you give us a short but complete example which demonstrates the problem? –  Jon Skeet Apr 7 '11 at 16:13
1  
My question should've been phrased better, but was looking to answer the generic question "In what cases will a DecimalFormat return a '?' when format()'ing –  yankee2905 Apr 7 '11 at 16:19
    
cleaned up my question, thanks guys –  yankee2905 Apr 7 '11 at 17:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's not a question mark, it's a U+FFFD REPLACEMENT CHARACTER, which is displayed as ? since it can't be mapped to the output encoding:

NaN is formatted as a string, which typically has a single character \uFFFD. This string is determined by the DecimalFormatSymbols object. This is the only value for which the prefixes and suffixes are not used.

Similarly, ? in representation of infinity is a U+221E INFINITY character (∞).

Infinity is formatted as a string, which typically has a single character \u221E, with the positive or negative prefixes and suffixes applied. The infinity string is determined by the DecimalFormatSymbols object.

See also:

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It'll return "?" if X is Float.NaN or Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY. It appears that Float.NEGATIVE_INFINITY returns "-?".

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