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Is there any difference between the order:

public static final String = "something";

or

public final static String = "something";

?

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1  
Nope. As long as it compiles. –  doc_180 Apr 7 '11 at 16:20
1  
IMHO, Following code convention order improves readability, nothing else. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 7 '11 at 17:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, although the Java Language Specification recommends that you use the first ordering:

FieldModifiers:
  FieldModifier
  FieldModifiers FieldModifier

FieldModifier: one of
  Annotation public protected private
  static final transient volatile

... If two or more (distinct) field modifiers appear in a field declaration, it is customary, though not required, that they appear in the order consistent with that shown above in the production for FieldModifier.

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Thanks, will follow the convention that recommends to use the first ordering. :) –  Richards Apr 7 '11 at 16:37

No - there is no difference betweeen the two.

From section 8.3.1 of the Java 2 Language Specification:

"If two or more (distinct) field modifiers appear in a field declaration, it is customary, though not required, that they appear in the order consistent with that shown above in the production for FieldModifier."

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I agree, as far as I know, there is no difference. However, there are code conventions that are recommended by java: oracle.com/technetwork/java/codeconv-138413.html –  hooknc Apr 7 '11 at 16:25
    
@hooknc: those do not mention keyword ordering... –  pgras Apr 7 '11 at 16:29
    
@pgras you seem to be correct. My bad. There is this post already that discusses the same topic: stackoverflow.com/questions/2832126/… –  hooknc Apr 7 '11 at 16:55

No. Pick one and follow that naming convention consistently

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