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which one of the following methodologies is safe from performance hits, assume that the size of List is large (may be 1,000 objects).

i)

List<String> myList = new ArrayList<String>();

for(int i=0; i <=10; i++){
    myList.add(""+i);
}

String[] array = myList.toArray(new String[myList.size()]);

myArrayMethod(array); // this method returns the array - it modifies the content but not size of array.

myListMethod(myList); // this method processes the list.

ii)

List<String> myList = new ArrayList<String>();

for(int i=0; i <=10; i++){
    myList.add(""+i);
}

String[] array = new String[myList.size()];
int i = 0;
for(String str : myList){
   array[i] = myList.get(i);
   i++;
}
myArrayMethod(array); // this method returns the array - it modifies the content but not size of array.

myListMethod(myList); // this method processes the list.
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2  
1000 items is large? Oh. –  corsiKa Apr 7 '11 at 17:13
    
replace foreach by normal for in ii) example –  smas Apr 7 '11 at 17:37
    
@smas why you say so? –  dantuch Apr 7 '11 at 18:22
    
@dantuch I don't know why there is foreach, str variable is unused. i++ is near end for-body. In this case better is normal for –  smas Apr 7 '11 at 18:29

4 Answers 4

The first example is slightly more efficient as it can use System.arraycopy() internally.

However, compared to everything else you are doing e.g. creating the Strings, it makes a very little difference and I would suggest you do what you believe is clearer

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toArray() is much readable and faster.

If you look at source code toArray method you'll notice that there are some conditionals and arraycopy method.

// ArrayList.class:
public <T> T[] toArray(T[] a) {
    if (a.length < size) 
        return (T[]) Arrays.copyOf(elementData, size, a.getClass());
    System.arraycopy(elementData, 0, a, 0, size);
    if (a.length > size)
        a[size] = null;
    return a;
}

// System.class
public static native void arraycopy // native method

The arraycopy is much faster for huge array than manually adding. I've tested it, I checked duration for i) and for ii)

  • i) your first example: toArray
  • ii) your second: manual adding

100 000 elements: i) 2 ms ii) 12 ms

1 000 000 elements: i) 10 ms ii) 65 ms

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I would go with option 1 if it were my code, because I just have a feeling the Collections API will do this better than I will.

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Relatively speaking they have the same performance characteristics, so given that, use the built in version

String[] array = myList.toArray(new String[myList.size()]);
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