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I'd like to lay out a list such as the following in 2/3 evenly spaced columns

<ul>
  <li>one<li>
  <li>two<li>
  <li>three<li>
  <li>four<li>
  <li>five<li>
  <li>six<li>
  <li>seven<li>
  <li>eight<li>
  <li>nine<li>
</ul>

One solution is to separate the list into two lists and float one of them right, possibly with a margin, e.g.

  <div id="col2">
    <ul>
      <li>one<li>
      <li>two<li>
      <li>three<li>
      <li>four<li>
      <li>five<li>
    </ul>
  </div>

  <ul>
    <li>six<li>
    <li>seven<li>
    <li>eight<li>
    <li>nine<li>
  </ul>

#col2 {
    float: right;
    margin-right: 450px;
}

This works OK, but has a number of shortcomings:

  1. (Un)semantic markup - it's not really 2 lists, I've split a single list into 2, just to make it easier to style
  2. The margin must be manually set to something that gives the appearance of being evenly spaced
  3. If the browser is made sufficiently narrow, the right-hand column will run into the second.

Is there a better way to do this, preferably without using a table?


Update:

I tried out Method 1, but I'm seeing some strange results. If you look at this 3-column list on you'll see there are 'holes' in the first 2 columns. Any idea why?

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Have you given the items a fixed height? –  jeroen Feb 18 '09 at 13:39

4 Answers 4

This article from A List Apart covers the commonly-accepted, close-to-best-practices-as-we-can-get methods for doing what you describe.

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1  
Holy crap, that's a very long article for what I'd hoped would be a reasonably simple task. Thanks for the link! –  Dónal Feb 17 '09 at 22:38
    
As it´s an unordered list instead of an ordered list, you can just go with Method 1. –  jeroen Feb 17 '09 at 22:59
    
Great link. This is one of those things that seems like it should be simple but isn't in practice. –  Chuck Feb 18 '09 at 0:18

I don´t know if you want 2 directly below 1 or if it can be next to 1 like:

    1    2    3
    4    5    6

Because if that´s the case, you can give your li's a fixed width of 33% and float them or display them inline.

Edit: It´s basically method 1 of the article Rex M referred to (just read it, nice):

You can use the html that´s already there, the first complete list and add the styles:

ul {
    width: 100%;        // for example
}
li {
    float: left;        // option 1
    display: inline;    // option 2, just one of the two
    width: 33%;         // for 3 columns, use 50% for two columns
}

It´s all in the article as well.

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If possible could you show the HTML/CSS for your suggestion? –  Dónal Feb 17 '09 at 22:34

Height of <li>-s is different. Try to set fixed height for a list item in css. You can also use something like

border: 1px solid red;

As one of the rules for list item to see what's going on.

I vote for a table here too since using method one breaks order of items. But if that's not an issue for you, then go ahead.

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Why without using a table? This is precisely what tables were intended for.

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I´ve had to maintain lists that were split in different table columns and a single list is a lot easier to maintain. –  jeroen Feb 17 '09 at 20:40
    
I agree with jeroen. The OP has a single list of entities - not tabular data. A UL or DL is the best choice IMHO, even though it's a bit tricky to format. –  Mark Hurd Feb 17 '09 at 20:50
2  
I disagree that this is precisely what a table is intended for. IMO, a table is for tabular data with rows, columns, headings, footers, captions, etc. What I have is merely a list that I want to layout over a number of columns. –  Dónal Feb 17 '09 at 23:04
2  
@james curran no, tables are for tables. lists are for lists. divs and CSS are for structuring things visually. This is a list. –  Rex M Feb 18 '09 at 0:29

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